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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Anglais) Broché – 5 mars 2009

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

A sizzling drama of desire, avarice and deception set in the American Deep South, Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Big Daddy' Pollitt, the richest cotton planter in the Mississippi Delta, is about to celebrate his sixty-fifth birthday. His two sons have returned home for the occasion: Gooper, his wife and children, Brick, an ageing football hero who has turned to drink, and his feisty wife Maggie. As the hot summer evening unfolds, the veneer of happy family life and Southern gentility gradually slips away as unpleasant truths emerge and greed, lies, jealousy and suppressed sexuality threaten to reach boiling point. Made into a film starring Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a masterly portrayal of family tensions and individuals trapped in prisons of their own making. Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) was born in Columbus, Mississippi. When his father, a travelling salesman, moved with his family to St Louis some years later, both he and his sister found it impossible to settle down to city life. He entered college during the Depression and left after a couple of years to take a clerical job in a shoe company. He stayed there for two years, spending the evenings writing. He received a Rockefeller Fellowship in 1940 for his play Battle of Angels, and he won the Pulitzer Prize in 1948 and 1955. Among his many other plays Penguin have published The Glass Menagerie (1944), The Rose Tattoo (1951), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), Sweet Bird of Youth (1959), The Night of the Iguana (1961), and Small Craft Warnings (1972). If you enjoyed Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, you might like Williams's The Glass Menagerie, also published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Tennessee Williams will live as long as drama itself ... he is, quite simply, indispensable'Peter Shaffer, author of Equus

Biographie de l'auteur

Tennessee Williams was born in 1911 in Columbus, Mississippi, where his grandfather was the episcopal clergyman. When his father, a travelling salesman, moved with his family to St Louis some years later, both he and his sister found it impossible to settle down to city life. He entered college during the Depression and left after a couple of years to take a clerical job in a shoe company. He stayed there for two years, spending the evening writing. He entered the University of Iowa in 1938 and completed his course, at the same time holding a large number of part-time jobs of great diversity. He received a Rockefeller Fellowship in 1940 for his play Battle of Angels, and he won the Pulitzer Prize in 1948 and 1955. Among his many other plays Penguin have published Summer and Smoke (1948), The Rose Tattoo (1951), Camino Real (1953), Baby Doll (1957), Orpheus Descending (1957), Something Unspoken (1958), Suddenly Last Summer (1958), Period of Adjustment (1960), The Night of the Iguana (1961), The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore (1963), and Small Craft Warnings (1972). Tennessee Williams died in 1983.

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Format: Broché
…may throw the first stone, to paraphrase a Biblical injunction. I still remember the “racy” movie posters, featuring Elizabeth Taylor, when this play was first issued as a movie in the 1950’s. I neither saw the movie, nor watched a production of the play. Thanks to a recent reading of The Glass Menagerie I decided that I needed to read more of this quintessential American (and Southern) playwright. “Cat…” was first produced in 1955, and would win the Pulitzer Prize.

The play is set in the largest mansion in the very heart of the rich farmland of the Mississippi delta, near Clarksville. There are three acts, but the time period is continuous. ‘Big Daddy’ is now 65, and owner of the plantation. He is still “rough-hewed,” having once been the overseer of the plantation that was owned by two “sisters” (gays), Jack Straw and Peter Ochello. Homosexuality, a “racy” topic in the 1950’s, is a theme throughout the play. ‘Big Daddy’s’ wife is, sure enough, ‘Big Mama.’ They have two sons, Brick and Gooper, who are each married, respectively, to Maggie and Mae. Each of the women have societal pretenses, one raised in Memphis, and the other Nashville. Gooper is the oldest, and with Mae has five “no-neck” children, with a sixth on the way. Brick and Mae are childless. He is also a serious alcoholic, morose over his lost college athletic “glory days,” and his relationship with his buddy, Skipper, now dead. The reason for Brick and Maggie’s childlessness – that he will not sleep with her – and his probable homosexual relationship with Skipper is developed as the play progresses. ‘Big Mama’ frankly criticizes Maggie for failing to perform her “bed duties,” and keep her son happy.
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Format: Broché Achat vérifié
la reception du livre a été rapide mais le livre avait été souligné à plusieurs endroits, ce qui est gênant pour sa propre lecture
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.4 étoiles sur 5 117 commentaires
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The family that is without conflict… 6 mai 2016
Par John P. Jones III - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
…may throw the first stone, to paraphrase a Biblical injunction. I still remember the “racy” movie posters, featuring Elizabeth Taylor, when this play was first issued as a movie in the 1950’s. I neither saw the movie, nor watched a production of the play. Thanks to a recent reading of The Glass Menagerie (New Directions Books) I decided that I needed to read more of this quintessential American (and Southern) playwright. “Cat…” was first produced in 1955, and would win the Pulitzer Prize.

The play is set in the largest mansion in the very heart of the rich farmland of the Mississippi delta, near Clarksville. There are three acts, but the time period is continuous. ‘Big Daddy’ is now 65, and owner of the plantation. He is still “rough-hewed,” having once been the overseer of the plantation that was owned by two “sisters” (gays), Jack Straw and Peter Ochello. Homosexuality, a “racy” topic in the 1950’s, is a theme throughout the play. ‘Big Daddy’s’ wife is, sure enough, ‘Big Mama.’ They have two sons, Brick and Gooper, who are each married, respectively, to Maggie and Mae. Each of the women have societal pretenses, one raised in Memphis, and the other Nashville. Gooper is the oldest, and with Mae has five “no-neck” children, with a sixth on the way. Brick and Mae are childless. He is also a serious alcoholic, morose over his lost college athletic “glory days,” and his relationship with his buddy, Skipper, now dead. The reason for Brick and Maggie’s childlessness – that he will not sleep with her – and his probable homosexual relationship with Skipper is developed as the play progresses. ‘Big Mama’ frankly criticizes Maggie for failing to perform her “bed duties,” and keep her son happy. They all live in the mansion house, and are jockeying for the inheritance. It is a “heady” mix.

Mendacity, greed, sexual longing are all themes woven throughout the play. About half this Kindle edition contains various essays of commentary, the most meaningful one from Tennessee Williams himself. The influence and relationship of Williams with the director Elia Kazan is described. I even learned that this play was the favorite of Fidel Castro, who greeted Williams on their first meeting with the exclamation: “Oh, that Cat!” The play’s evolution and various versions are discussed (perhaps more than most people need to know), and an entirely different third act is also included.

Reading, or watching a performance of Williams’ plays is an important part of the “curriculum” of any student of American drama – whatever the age of that student. 5-stars for “The Cat.”
14 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The pinnacle of American Drama 26 octobre 2011
Par B. Wilfong - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This is a superbly written play about that most basic of human issues, the desire to communicate honestly and openly with someone that you care about. At its core, Tennessee Williams' masterpiece is really about nothing more than that. Everyone wants and needs someone to listen to, and accept, you.
All of Williams' plays are about lonely people when you come right down to it. However, "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" is unique in that these lonely characters are part of a large family, and at times are literally tripping over each other. What makes us lonely is our inability to communicate with those that we love. It is in that essential human drive that Williams creates the tragedy of this piece. A father knows his son is a closeted gay man; he loves him, but can't get the son to believe or accept that. A wife knows the truth about her husband, but can't make herself believe it. (Actually that last one applies to two wives in the play, for different reasons.) A man faces death, in essence alone, because he can't admit how terrified he is. And the list goes on. These are the stories of the Pollitt family of the Mississippi Delta. Those particulars are different for all of us, but the essential worries and fears of the members of this family are universal, and have been at the heart of a powerful drama for over 50 years.
The witting of this play is luminous and gorgeous. In fact, at times it reads like poetry. However, the power in this piece is also due in large part to the structure of this three act play. The first act is almost a solo from the character of Maggie. The second act is a painful and terrifying duet from the characters of Brick and Big Daddy, and the final act is the ensemble number that builds, and then ends on a slow drawn out note.
If you see "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" in performance it is a long play, and at times painful. You will not feel the same intensity unless you let yourself sit down and devour it in one gulp. Read the play in a day, and you will come closer to approximating seeing it in performance than you otherwise would. In the best of possible worlds, you will read it, and then a month or so later see it in a well done performance.
This play is the pinnacle of American Drama. You should know it. Make that the case if it is not so!
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Hidden Desires and Dark Truths Unfold on Stage 9 juillet 2015
Par Margaret Carmel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This was the first Tennessee Williams play that I've ever read, so I was really interested to check it out.

And wow. This work shocked me so much more than I was expecting. Released in the 1950s, this play never leaves the confines of the Maggie and Brick's bedroom but tackles issues of homosexuality, hypocrisy, marriage, escapism, love, lies, and the confines of manliness.

Over the course of the novel the characters are constantly battling with truths that lurk just beneath the surface. Brick's love for his friend Skipper, Big Daddy's illness, and Maggie's frustrations of being a married woman all work to create an image of 1950s southern America struggling to find it's footing in a shifting moral world. I loved how Big Mama believed that if Brick and Maggie just had a child, then these problems would melt away. This representation of the Southern ideals of traditional families and inheritances flying in the face of reality is just as telling today as it was 60 years ago.

Can't wait to read more Williams.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Paywright vs Director's version of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 15 septembre 2013
Par Ted d'Afflisio - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I read both versions of the play: Tennessee William's and those with the director's judgments included and felt I liked TW's version better. It seemed to have more dramatic irony, particularly at the conclusion, though before reading this the only version I was ever aware of was the screen version -- and Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor were perfectly cast for their roles.

The one director's change that seemed to me straight to the point was the decision to keep Big Daddy. There I think TW made a mistake to let him "die" out before the end as his presence heightens the dramatic tension between father-son, father-son-son's wife, and father and Maggie the Cat. These are the soul of that play, not the relationship to Skipper which is so understated but appears in plays by TW. It may have ben his issue; I don't think it is what is at issue in this play to me that is the Dig Daddy-son-Maggie relationship and interrelationships. For that the director's suggestions were right to the point but TW should have held out for his own concluding lines. .
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Kindle version NOT exact to the book 14 octobre 2013
Par castigo - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This is an amazing piece of work. Williams is a genious, and this play is absolutely fantastic.
That being said, I purchased the Kindle version of this upon being cast in the play. I wanted the Kindle version so my wife and I could read lines with the printed text.
We discovered that although the text is very similar, it IS NOT AN EXACT MATCH to the printed paper version of this. I am very disappointed with this, since I carefully matched ISBN numbers.
That being said, if you are just wanting to read the play, this is great. But if you want it to match the script to run lines, buy a copy to have paper-in-hand.
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