Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 10,05

Économisez
EUR 8,81 (47%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Cheerio Tom, Dick and Harry par [Ruth, Wajnryb]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

Cheerio Tom, Dick and Harry Format Kindle


Voir les 3 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 10,05

Longueur : 283 pages Composition améliorée: Activé Page Flip: Activé
Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Wajnryb is the grammarian you always wanted: wise, wearing her erudition lightly and enlivening it with sly humour.'

Kirkus Reviews



Ruth Wajnryb embarks on a voyage of discovery among the words that once peppered the language of baby boomers and their parents to discover why they seem to be slipping from common use. Why is it that people don't say cheerio' any more, and, come to think of it, why did they in the first place? Do people still tinker with jalopies? And whatever happened to Tom, Dick and Harry, not to mention all those other folk who provided us with such excellent conversational shorthand? Filled with entertaining vignettes and intriguing etymology, Ruth has created an imaginary hospice that offers a caring refuge for pre-loved words that are in imminent danger of being dismissed as obs' (for

obsolete') or arch' (for archaic') in English dictionaries.



Written with Ruth Wajnryb's characteristic intelligence, sly wit and lan, Cheerio Tom, Dick and Harry examines the way in which our everyday language reflects and gives expression to the enormous changes that have taken place in our physical and social landscape over the last fifty years or so.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 591 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 283 pages
  • Editeur : Allen & Unwin (26 juin 2010)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003U2SKV6
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Lecteur d’écran : Pris en charge
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : Soyez la première personne à écrire un commentaire sur cet article
  • Voulez-vous nous parler de prix plus bas?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoile

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 3.6 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A great read for all who love the English language. 7 juillet 2013
Par Lindsay Klimionok - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
A fabulous, funny read. Thoroughly enjoyed the book and the marvellous tongue in cheek humour that accompanied some interesting facts around the origins of words and expressions that are dying out in English. The author writes with an ease that makes reading enjoyable, informative and hilarious!
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Cripes! 8 janvier 2012
Par Simon Barrett 'Il Penseroso' - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
A beguiling title (did you know Dick 'n 'Arry was old cockney slang for dictionary?) but this is mere middleaged maundering, a mum musing on me-generation mores. A book could be written about the words and expressions we have lost and the sociological and philosophical implications, but this isn't it. She's on to something when she points out how our speech has grown more compressed (#16,17,19) and in so doing some of the colour has been leached out of it - anyone remember slap and tickle? In general though, what could have been profound is reduced to over-the-garden-fence chitchat
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous