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In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist par [Feuerman, Ruchama King]
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Longueur : 281 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

Revue de presse

"Confused about the background of the Gaza conflict? This vibrant evocation of modern Jerusalem may shed some light." —Daily Mail

"Romantic, suspenseful and insightful." —Hadassah Magazine

"...[a] beguiling novel...Feuerman writes with grace and wit...'In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist' is as wise as it is heartfelt."  —Jewish Week 

“A delicate balance of courtship tale and thriller. . . beautifully detailed and vivid. . . I strongly recommend it.” —Rebecca Stumpf, Dallas Morning News

“A sophisticated and engaging book that treats an endlessly tangled topic—relations between Palestinian Arabs and Jews—with intelligence and originality. . . . a manifestly terrific novel.”—Barton Swaim, The Wall Street Journal

"How easy it would have been for Ruchama King Feuerman to write the typical Jerusalem novel, with the typical Middle East obliquities: Arab-Israeli/Israeli-Jew friendship pitted against the external tension of social and political pressures....But Feuerman isn’t typical, and in her new book, In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist, she tells a story that is spiritually generous and astutely realistic about an Arab-Israeli and an Israeli-Jew, who may be the most unlikely pair of friends we’ve seen in current fiction." —The Brooklyn Rail

“Feuerman tells a tale of human beings who seek to make connections with each other against all odds. . . .One of the great pleasures of her novel. . . is her rich and vivid evocation of contemporary Jerusalem, and especially the people and places in Jerusalem that would not be out of place in a novel by Isaac Bashevis Singer. . . She may be the Jewish Jane Austen, but she is also something of a Jewish Graham Greene.” —Jonathan Kirsch, Los Angeles Jewish Journal

“Feuerman’s novel has the most vivid, alive characters, like [the] big huge novels from India by Rohinton Mistry.” —Bill McKibben, Boston Globe

“A beautiful novel that coils the history and mystery of Jerusalem into a private and vivid tale of personal dignity, ownership, love—and the overlap of all three, the space we call the soul.” —Dara Horn, author of Guide for the Perplexed

In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist is ultimately a story of love transcending deformity, both inner and outer. . . a book that speaks of seeing beyond appearances: beyond large entities such as the Arab or Jewish collectives to the individual standing before us. . . extraordinary, delicate and memorable.” —Yael Unterman, Ha’aretz

“[A] testament to the power of the imagination. . . a rare talent.” —Beth Kissileff, The Jerusalem Post

In The Courtyard Of The Kabbalist is a beautifully written, emotionally evocative novel enriched by fascinating characters and an unparalleled portrait of the magical city that is Jerusalem. —Jonathan Kellerman

“The descriptions of Jerusalem and its inhabitants in Ruchama King Feuerman’s new novel. . . are so beautifully detailed and vivid that it’s almost as though the city carries its own voice in the narrative. While political turmoil always exists in Feuerman’s Jerusalem, it rarely takes center stage. The story is a delicate balance of courtship tale and thriller. . . I strongly recommend it for anyone who appreciates fiction about Israel, traditional Jews or the Mideast conflict.” —Rebecca Stumpf, Dallas Morning News

“[Feuerman] creates a compelling world within a world in Jerusalem. She conveys spiritual longings and the yearnings for human connection, all informed by the heavenly city and its mysteries.” —Sandee Brawarsky, Jewish Woman Magazine

“In her irresistible novel In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist, Ruchama King Feuerman writes with such contagious affection for her characters that they’re likely to supplant your own family until you finish the book. Her Jerusalem, riven though it is by tensions between the sacred and profane, remains an intoxicating place, where diffident lovers inhabit an atmosphere as romantically charged as The Song of Songs.” —Steve Stern, author of The Book of Mischief

“The emotions in Feuerman’s small but gripping story are love and fear. . . . The tour through [these characters’] hearts and minds, particularly Isaac’s and Mustafa’s, makes for some of the most deeply interesting, challenging reading of the year.” —Marakay Rogers, Broadway Books World

“Ruchama Feuerman combines qualities of I.B. Singer touched with the melancholy humor of Sholom Aleichem and Bernard Malamud, sparked with magical realism worthy of Isak Dinesen. Her vision is large and generous. In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist is exactly the kind of book I
wish I’d written myself.” —Liz Rozenberg, author of The Laws of Gravity

“Whose holiness matters? Whose claim on the land is longer, more lasting, more vital? Whose God is best? These most vexing of questions, which trap otherwise smart and even liberal-minded people in boxes they can’t seem to get themselves out of, emerge from this one spot in this one city. But what if, Feuerman wonders, a Muslim would offer irrefutable evidence of the Jewish presence on the Temple Mount? And what if a religious Jew would open his heart to save the life (and soul, presumably) of the Muslim? Could the boxes be broken? What if the answers lie right beneath our feet? Feuerman asks these most delectable questions in the form of a fable. . . infected, like the novels of Meir Shalev, with a kind of Jewish mystical magical realism. She is a wonderfully empathetic and perceptive writer. . . masterful.” —Nathaniel Popkin, Cleaver Magazine

“The unlikely friendship of an intellectual New York Jew and a working-class Jerusalem Arab drives Feuerman’s evocative second novel. . . . [Jerusalem] itself emerges as a character. . . depicted with a lyricism that contrasts with the area’s political tension. . . . [The] story unfolds as a belated coming-of-age tale. . . [written in a] quiet, lovely mood.” —Publishers Weekly

“A tender, almost Malamudian fable of chosenness and redemption, In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist is not content to tread lightly upon sacred ground, but dares to dig for treasure below.”—Robert Cohen, author of Amateur Barbarians

“Feuerman is such an engrossing story writer, we want to keep reading and reading. . . . absorbing, fascinating. . . .written by a creative storyteller with an amazing skill for originality.” —Kansas City Jewish Chronicle

“Feuerman writes with authority and convincing detail that soon draws readers into her story with its ‘mishmash of cultures.’ With its colorful and believable cast of characters, this book is a hearty and flavorful chicken soup to warm the spirits of anyone interested in. . .Middle Eastern society with all its blemishes and hopes.” —Library Journal

“How do people get along when they have been taught they can’t? Who do ancient artifacts belong to—the person who unearths them or the people who valued them in the past? This is just one of the story lines in this lively, witty, and entertaining novel. Ruchama King writes with a light touch and great insight. This book is hard to put down.” —Alice Elliott Dark, author of In the Gloaming and Think of England

“This is a story that toys with, then rejects, cliches, politics, and religious stereotypes. Too many people choose to see this part of the world as either black or white. Ruchama King Feuermam paints it in a hundred shades of gray.” —Helen Maryles Shankman, author of The Color of Light

“ . . . a richly woven tale of self discovery, romance and culture clash against the backdrop of Jerusalem. . . [this] elegantly written novel spins the tale of three enchanting characters whose search for love and meaning is bound to resonate with readers.” —Deena Yellin, Jewish Standard

“I love fiction that teaches me something. The Courtyard of the Kabbalist not only taught me about the Koran, the Kabbalah, archeology, and the Mideast, it also taught me much about how the window of the human heart can fling open, allowing light into the darkest places.” —Rochelle Jewel Shapiro, author of Miriam the Medium and Kaylee’s Ghost

“An amazing novel that lets you in a magical exotic world. Both entertaining and enlightening.” —Lara Vapnyar

"In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist is a beautifully written, emotionally evocative novel enriched by fascinating characters and an unparalleled portrait of the magical city that is Jerusalem." —Jonathan Kellerman

"In her irresistible novel In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist, Ruchama King Feuerman writes with such contagious affection for her characters that they’re likely to supplant your own family until you finish the book. Her Jerusalem, riven though it is by tensions between the sacred and profane, remains an intoxicating place, where diffident lovers inhabit an atmosphere as romantically charged as 'The Song of Songs.'"-Steve Stern, author of The Wedding Jester

"How do people get along when they have been taught they can’t? Who do ancient artifacts belong to — the person who unearths them or the people who valued them in the past? This is just one of the story lines in this lively, witty, and entertaining novel. Ruchama King writes with a light touch and great insight. This book is hard to put down." –Alice Elliott Dark

Présentation de l'éditeur

An eczema-riddled, middle-aged former Lower East Side haberdasher, Isaac Markowitz, moves to Israel where he becomes, much to his own surprise, the assistant to a famous old rabbi who daily dispenses wisdom (and soup) to the collection of seekers gathered in his courtyard. It is there that he meets Tamar, a young American woman on a mission to live a spiritual life with a spiritual man, and who sees Isaac as that man long before he sees himself that way. Into both of their lives comes Mustafa, a devout Muslim, deformed at birth, unloved by his own mother, a janitor who works on the Temple Mount, holy to both Muslims and Jews.

When Isaac, quite by accident, runs into the crippled custodian going about his work and suggests that he is, by cleaning this holy site, like a Kohain, a Jewish high priest, Mustafa is overcome: This Jew is the first person in his life who sees him as someone worthy. In turn, Mustafa sees Isaac as someone wise who can help him. When Mustafa finds an ancient shard of pottery that may date back to the first temple, he brings it to Isaac in gratitude.  That gesture sets in motion a series of events that land Isaac in  the company of Israel's worst criminal riff raff, put Mustafa in mortal danger, and Tamar trying to save them both.

As  these characters - immigrants and natives; Muslim and Jewish; prophets and lost souls - move through their world, they are never sure if they will fall prey to the cruel tricks of luck or be sheltered by a higher power.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 4021 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 281 pages
  • Editeur : NYRB LIT (17 septembre 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00C8RZHG0
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 4.5 étoiles sur 5 102 commentaires
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 "As deliciously satisfying, rich and authentic as a fresh Jerusalem pita still warm from the bakery." 26 décembre 2013
Par Carol Levin - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist is an engaging, beautifully crafted and courageous novel that shatters stereotypes, going beyond the geopolitical tension of Jerusalem’s Temple Mount to reveal the internal struggles and compassion of the heart. Against this backdrop is a multi-layered story of friendship between a lonely Arab janitor -- afflicted with a crooked neck and abandoned by his family -- and a single Jewish man who leaves his unfulfilling life in New York and finds his way as the assistant to a rabbi with “a gift for analyzing difficulties of the soul.”

The story deepens with both intrigue as the Jerusalem police tail Isaac – he accepted as a gift a rare antiquity from the Temple Mount, thereby endangering the State of Israel -- and a budding romance between Isaac and the beautifully quirky Tamar. As in her previous novel, Seven Blessings, Feuerman has a gift for capturing the pulse of Jerusalem in the details, from riding the buses and blind dating at a hotel lobby to buying vegetables in the souk. Here, her writing soars in the deep compassion she evokes for the broken supplicants who drift into the courtyard of the kabbalist’s cottage waiting their turn for his life-sustaining words.

The poignant and sometimes hilarious descriptions -- a man weeping behind his briefcase, a barren midwife, an old lady in pink biker shorts -- suggest that everyone needs fixing and spiritual sustenance in some way or other. Feuerman beautifully captures the transformative power of a kind word spoken when Isaac tells the lonely Mustafa he is doing holy work by keeping the Temple Mount clean. He is lifted by his newfound dignity.

Feuerman weaves a multiplicity of themes into a story as deliciously satisfying, rich and authentic as a fresh Jerusalem pita still warm from the bakery.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 In a Courtyard of Love 1 juin 2017
Par Pax1065 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
It took me a while to wade into this book. I put it down for a while and then picked it up again after a couple of months or more. It is a wonderful story centering on two men with a similar problem - feeling like an outsider. Only one is an Arab and the other a Religious Jew. The come together and forge a different type of friendship one that wouldn't be totally accepted in either man's world. The story moves along quickly once you get past the first chapters, you start to care about the two men, Tamar who comes to Israel looking to lead a holy life and find her soul mate. This book isn't for everyone, but if you know Israel, about Kabbalah, Jerusalem and the Holy Sites, this story will appeal to you.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Spiritually and emotionally deep, but little chemistry 14 mai 2014
Par MS - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Since I had loved Ruchama King Feurman's previous book, I looked forward to this one eagerly.

However, I was disappointed. The book had the same deep emotional insight into characters and it didn't refrain from avoiding flaws. However, I felt the characterization of Tamar was lacking. I didn't feel like I really knew what made her tick, what she thought and felt, how she would react in different situations. I didn't read any chemistry in the relationship between her and Isaac, and didn't understand why she would be interested in someone like Isaac. This may have a lot to do with my personal dislike of Isaac's personality and lifestyle. I don't like overemphasis on spiritual gurus. So my personal likes and dislikes probably colored my feelings about this novel.

Also, I felt the story got out of control and overly dramatic at the end with the whole imprisonment, police, and wall-falling plot. The story didn't need any more drama- what was going on with the characters was dramatic enough.

I also didn't like the whole Arab/Israeli conflict being brought into this. I know this was an attempt to be a lot more human and sensitive than what's out there- I just personally don't like the whole situation and talk about it gets me uncomfortable.

In sum, a lot of what I didn't like about the book were due to my own personal tastes, and also the lack of Tamar's characterization, her and Isaac's chemistry, and the melodrama at the end.

Oh, well. I'll just go and reread Seven Blessings for the fourth time. :)
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A novel about unexpected friendships in a politically charged environment 20 mai 2014
Par Judy Gruen - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This novel develops around the unlikely friendship between Mustafa, an Arab janitor from the Temple Mount, and Isaac, an Orthodox Jew who has found refuge from the problems of his own life as the assistant to a revered Kabbalist to whom people flock for blessings and advice.

A small kindness from Isaac to Mustafa sets it all in motion. Mustafa suffers both physical and emotional pain from a deformation that makes his neck irredeemably twisted. Shunned by his mother and rejected socially, Mustafa clings with excitement to the idea, suggested by Isaac, that his work cleaning at the Temple Mount is a bit similar to that of the Kohein, or High Priest, who used to serve in the ancient Temple and whose job also involved cleaning. This is a gift of self-esteem that Mustafa has never received from family or friends. As a token of thanks, he brings Isaac a fragment from the site where the Waqf is literally demolishing and trashing ancient artifacts from the days when the Temple stood in Jerusalem.

This sets into motion a series of events that places both Isaac and Mustafa in danger -- Mustafa because he would be considered a collaborator and would surely be killed; and Isaac because the Israeli authorities do not want to make waves politically over the excavations on the Temple Mount.

Feuerman tells the story beautifully, and adds texture and depth through a secondary storyline about Isaac and his fears of forming a romantic relationship. Both Isaac and Mustafa live with feelings of inadequacy and unfilled dreams. Through their friendship, they each are able to find courage and understanding with "the other" in their midst.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 No Good Guys / Bad Guys, Just People Following Their Compasses 30 octobre 2015
Par sephardit - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This is a wonderfully engaging story written by an author who knows her way around Jerusalem's neighborhoods and understands human nature as well. It can be especially interesting to those who know the habits and ideals of the Orthodox, and for those who find compelling the idea of a friendship between an Arab maintenance worker and an almost-rabbi who is devoted to the well-being of at-loose-ends Jews who regularly assemble in the courtyard of the Kabbalist. Lots of subtle twists give the story its spice. If the characters are broadly drawn, it's enough that they convey human qualities that we immediately recognize. There are no really bad guys, which is a refreshing change from the tiresome dichotomies we find in today's news stories.
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