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50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do) par [Tulley, Gever, Spiegler, Julie]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do) Format Kindle

4.0 étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire client

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Format Kindle
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EUR 12,00

Longueur : 144 pages Langue : Anglais

Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

An activity book about danger, safety, and the incredible world around us.

In a time when children are too often coddled, 50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do) reminds readers that climbing trees is good for the soul, and that a pocket knife is not a weapon. Full of exciting ways children can explore the world around them, this book explains how to "Play with Fire" and "Taste Electricity" while learning about safety. With easy-to-follow instructions, it includes:

• Activities, like walking a tightrope
• Skills, like throwing a spear
• Projects, like melting glass
• Experiences, like sleeping in the wild

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Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2860 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 144 pages
  • Editeur : NAL; Édition : Reprint (3 mai 2011)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B004RKXHW2
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Composition améliorée: Non activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.0 étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°337.903 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Par L2a le 28 octobre 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Ce livre est chouette, drôle et utile, même pour les adultes avertis qui ont fait plein de bêtises étant jeunes.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x92e4ca44) étoiles sur 5 95 commentaires
159 internautes sur 160 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9075af78) étoiles sur 5 Release your kids from the bubble wrap 4 janvier 2010
Par Deborah L. Nies - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I discovered Gever Tulley on [...] and was fascinated by his speech entitled "5 Dangerous Things you Should let your Children do." Among the list of five things that Mr. Tulley suggested that children should do: play with fire, drive a car and own a pocketknife. Let me say that these suggestions initially tormented this helicopter mom.

Yes, fellow parents, I can feel the cringes now. But, let's think about it. We used to be free-range children. We rode our bicycles without helmets. We played in the neighborhood/woods all day long, only returning home for dinner refueling. We whittled with pocketknives, and yes, most of us probably played with fire. We probably survived these experiences unscathed or with minor scrapes.

The "5 Dangerous Things" lecture was the precursor to his new book which has just been published, and it is called "50 Dangerous Things (you should let your children do)." My tween daughter and I are working our way through this hands-on activity book, which has space for your own field notes.

Mr. Tulley's book promotes learning, and believe it or not, safety. Quote from his website: "There are many "dangerous" things that are interesting, eye-opening, enlightening or just plain fun! And while there are aspects of danger in virtually everything we do, the trick is to learn how mastery actually minimizes danger."

As parents, we need to give our children opportunities to tinker, explore and experiment. We must endeavor to raise the next generation of great thinkers. We already have our copy...where's yours?
62 internautes sur 67 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9075ce4c) étoiles sur 5 It would be dangerous to NOT buy this book... 19 mai 2011
Par Deborah L. Nies - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I discovered Gever Tulley on [...] and was fascinated by his speech entitled "5 Dangerous Things you Should let your Children do." Among the list of five things that Mr. Tulley suggested that children should do: play with fire, drive a car and own a pocketknife. Let me say that these suggestions initially tormented this helicopter mom.

Yes, fellow parents, I can feel the cringes now. But, let's think about it. We used to be free-range children. We rode our bicycles without helmets. We played in the neighborhood/woods all day long, only returning home for dinner refueling. We whittled with pocketknives, and yes, most of us probably played with fire. We probably survived these experiences unscathed or with minor scrapes.

The "5 Dangerous Things" lecture was the precursor to his new book which has just been published, and it is called "50 Dangerous Things (you should let your children do)." My tween daughter and I are working our way through this hands-on activity book, which has space for your own field notes. We have already: whittled, thrown a spear, cooked a hot dog in the dishwasher, broke the recipe rules, exploded a bottle in the freezer, and cooked strange things in the microwave. Now THIS is a hands-on book!!

Mr. Tulley's book promotes learning, and believe it or not, safety. Quote from his website: "There are many "dangerous" things that are interesting, eye-opening, enlightening or just plain fun! And while there are aspects of danger in virtually everything we do, the trick is to learn how mastery actually minimizes danger."

As parents, we need to give our children opportunities to tinker, explore and experiment. We must endeavor to raise the next generation of great thinkers. We already have our copy...where's yours? (Pssst, here's a SECRET: It's as much fun for the adults as it is for the kids.)
64 internautes sur 70 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9075d3a8) étoiles sur 5 Clear, helpful, inspirational, appropriate 26 janvier 2010
Par Robert N. Jellinghaus - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I'm a parent of young children, so I certainly understand the urge to be protective. Still, sometimes it's more important to know when you're *too* scared of what might happen, and that's when this book comes in very handy indeed. Tulley and Spiegler do an excellent job of balancing caution with excitement; each of the fifty things has enough danger to be interesting, and enough background insight to be intriguing. The lack of sexism is also refreshing; this is a book for *all* kids, boys and girls alike.

All parents who want their kids to develop more confidence and skill in the face of hazardous life situations -- and isn't that *all* parents? -- can benefit from this book. Even if you don't do *any* of the things listed, the overall attitude -- that confidence comes from skill and from knowing and managing risk -- is very helpful and affirming.

I just have to comment on the one-star review here by "L. Helw." I am not sure why that reviewer got so upset at the concept of an activity book such as this, but most of their complaints seem to be addressed at some other book altogether. In particular, Fifty Dangerous Things is very clear that parents and kids should do only the things they find enjoyable, but the one-star reviewer seems to think the book is demanding that all kids do all fifty things. That's only one example of how the one-star review is based on, at best, a very shallow and hasty reading.
31 internautes sur 34 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9075d774) étoiles sur 5 Great book!!!!!!!!!! 14 janvier 2010
Par Hoop - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
This book is absolutely fabulous. It is so important to teach children how to be safe during the adventures you know they will have. The book is cute, clever, thorough and simply wonderful. We couldn't get enough and bought copies for all of our friends with kids! Such a creative and great way to introduce fun stuff for children to explore. Highest recommendations!!!
21 internautes sur 23 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9075d858) étoiles sur 5 Just Like ... But with less stuff 23 septembre 2010
Par James D. Nichol - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I think the surge of books that advocate children doing adventurous things is past due and there is a genuine need for it in our Helicopter Parent Society.

This is a good example but I would recommend a couple other books over this one.

The Dangerous Book for Boys

The Daring Book for Girls

Geek Dad: Awesomely Geeky Projects and Activities for Dads and Kids to Share

Theo Gray's Mad Science: Experiments You Can Do At Home - But Probably Shouldn't

Are a few that come to mind and are much better either because they have more complete list of supplies or in the case of the Dangerous Book for Boys and Dangerous Book for Boys, it isn't just stuff to do its stories and history that kids will actually enjoy.
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