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A Darkness More Than Night (A Harry Bosch Novel Book 7) (English Edition) par [Connelly, Michael]
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A Darkness More Than Night (A Harry Bosch Novel Book 7) (English Edition) Format Kindle

4.2 étoiles sur 5 9 commentaires client

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Format Kindle, 23 janvier 2001
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Longueur : 443 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais
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Description du produit

Amazon.com

When a sheriff's detective shows up on former FBI man Terry McCaleb's Catalina Island doorstep and requests his help in analyzing photographs of a crime scene, McCaleb at first demurs. He's newly married (to Graciela, who herself dragged him from retirement into a case in Blood Work), has a new baby daughter, and is finally strong again after a heart transplant. But once a bloodhound, always a bloodhound. One look at the video of Edward Gunn's trussed and strangled body puts McCaleb back on the investigative trail, hooked by two details: the small statue of an owl that watches over the murder scene and the Latin words "Cave Cave Dus Videt," meaning "Beware, beware, God sees," on the tape binding the victim's mouth.

Gunn was a small-time criminal who had been questioned repeatedly by LAPD Detective Harry Bosch in the unsolved murder of a prostitute, most recently on the night he was killed. McCaleb knows the tense, cranky Bosch (Michael Connelly's series star--see The Black Echo, The Black Ice, et al.) and decides to start by talking to him. But Bosch has time only for a brief chat. He's a prosecution witness in the high-profile trial of David Storey, a film director accused of killing a young actress during rough sex. By chance, however, McCaleb discovers an abstruse but concrete link between the scene of Gunn's murder and Harry Bosch's name:

"This last guy's work is supposedly replete with owls all over the place. I can't pronounce his first name. It's spelled H-I-E-R-O-N-Y-M-U-S. He was Netherlandish, part of the northern renaissance. I guess owls were big up there."

McCaleb looked at the paper in front of him. The name she had just spelled seemed familiar to him.

"You forgot his last name. What's his last name?"

"Oh, sorry. It's Bosch. Like the spark plugs."

Bosch fits McCaleb's profile of the killer, and McCaleb is both thunderstruck and afraid--thunderstruck that a cop he respects might have committed a horrendous murder and afraid that Bosch may just be good enough to get away with it. And when Bosch finds out (via a mysterious leak to tabloid reporter Jack McEvoy, late of Connelly's The Poet) that he's being investigated for murder, he's furious, knowing that Storey's defense attorney may use the information to help get his extravagantly guilty client off scot-free.

It's the kind of plot that used to make great Westerns: two old gunslingers circling each other warily, each of them wondering if the other's gone bad. But there's more than one black hat in them thar hills, and Connelly masterfully joins the plot lines in a climax and denouement that will leave readers gasping but satisfied. --Barrie Trinkle

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School-Harry Bosch, the worn, pragmatic Los Angeles police detective, protagonist of a number of Connelly's earlier books, is joined by Terry McCaleb, former FBI crime-scene profiler, introduced in Blood Work (Little, Brown, 1998). Harry is immersed in testifying at the murder trial of a Hollywood film director, Jack Storey. When McCaleb, retired and living a quiet life with a new wife and two young children, is asked by a former colleague to look at the investigation materials of a recent gruesome homicide, he realizes just how much he misses his vocation. Terry alone has noticed some clues from the crime-scene video that point toward the influence of Renaissance painter Hieronymus Bosch. Despite pleas from his wife, Terry is drawn into the investigation and finds, to his dismay, that pointers lead straight to acquaintance Harry Bosch, whose real name is Hieronymus. Certain details in Harry's life fit in well with the profile Terry is developing of a ritualistic killer. The clues stemming from Bosch's paintings may lead readers straight to the Internet to view some of Bosch's well-known works to see the clues for themselves. The plot is intricate, and the twists and turns keep coming, but it is so well done, and the characters are so vivid, that confusion isn't a problem. Despite its length, this involving book is a fast read with "can't put it down" appeal.

Carol DeAngelo, Kings Park Library, Burke, VA

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 3387 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 443 pages
  • Editeur : Little, Brown and Company (23 janvier 2001)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00H8BVXAU
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.2 étoiles sur 5 9 commentaires client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°26.818 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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4.2 étoiles sur 5
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Par Un client le 3 juillet 2003
Format: Poche
Une plongée dans un monde sombre et inquiétant, le passé se mélange au présent, l'art à la réalité... On finit par chercher les détails partout ! Plein de détours et de rebondissements, du suspens jusqu'au bout.
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Par Ravetto le 25 novembre 2012
Format: Poche Achat vérifié
L'intrigue est captivante, et, comme toujours chez Connelly, les personnages ont une réelle profondeur.
Dans celui-ci (L'Oiseau des Ténèbres, en français), Harry Bosch rencontre Terry McCaleb, le personnage principal de Bloodwork (Créance de Sang).
À ne pas manquer.
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Format: Format Kindle
The title refers to the inspiration behind the paintings of Hieronymus Bosch (d. 1516) and the eyes of his namesake, a detective at the LAPD better known as just Harry Bosch. But his eyes are black and penetrating too. In Vietnam, he was a tunnel rat in subterranean Vietcong networks. When this book starts (Michael Connelly’s 7th about him), Bosch has served the LAPD for 26 years and he is not an undisputed hero among colleagues. And can a policeman who solved so many murders ever relax? After all, some of the culprits will be released one day...
In this book Bosch’s wife has left him, but he hopes she will return. He is also a key police investigator and witness at a murder trial, but soon finds himself a suspect in the same case, then of more unsolved murders. How this ends is not for me to explain.
Think MC is the top writer of police procedurals, along with Ian Rankin is the UK. Their books are carefully and believably plotted about the ambitions and rivalries in the snake pits of large police forces, where true crime fighters are becoming rare. Both writers have one hero and dozens of secondary characters who appear in their books, sometimes after many years. Both heroes, Harry Bosch in LA and John Rebus in Edinburgh, Scotland are fearless crime fighters, driven by more than just ambition. They want justice for victims and their families. Nothing less and no matter how long ago a murder occurred.
In this thriller, MC made Harry Bosch a murder suspect because he wanted to picture him from another perspective. The way MC stacks up a burden of proof against him and uses the historical Hieronymus Bosch is breathtakingly clever. The title and darkness is all over the book, incl. musical titles. Highlight in a brilliant series.
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Format: Poche
Comme presque tous les Connelly (pour ne pas dire tous) ,une fois plongée dedans il est très difficile d'en sortir avant la fin
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The well known painter Hieronymus Bosch. Well known? Not that much in fact and page after page we will discover the link(s) between the painter and the criminal madness of the "bad-darker-than-night". This aspect is very well documented.
The reader is directly in the story is never lost in non-useful details. Until the very end of the book, everything can happen.
That's excellent, thank you Michael.
Enjoy!
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