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Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering par [Glass, Robert L.]
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Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering 1 , Format Kindle


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Description du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

The practice of building software is a “new kid on the block” technology. Though it may not seem this way for those who have been in the field for most of their careers, in the overall scheme of professions, software builders are relative “newbies.”

In the short history of the software field, a lot of facts have been identified, and a lot of fallacies promulgated. Those facts and fallacies are what this book is about.

There’s a problem with those facts–and, as you might imagine, those fallacies. Many of these fundamentally important facts are learned by a software engineer, but over the short lifespan of the software field, all too many of them have been forgotten. While reading Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering , you may experience moments of “Oh, yes, I had forgotten that,” alongside some “Is that really true?” thoughts.

The author of this book doesn’t shy away from controversy. In fact, each of the facts and fallacies is accompanied by a discussion of whatever controversy envelops it. You may find yourself agreeing with a lot of the facts and fallacies, yet emotionally disturbed by a few of them! Whether you agree or disagree, you will learn why the author has been called “the premier curmudgeon of software practice.”

These facts and fallacies are fundamental to the software building field–forget or neglect them at your peril!

Quatrième de couverture

The practice of building software is a “new kid on the block” technology. Though it may not seem this way for those who have been in the field for most of their careers, in the overall scheme of professions, software builders are relative “newbies.”

In the short history of the software field, a lot of facts have been identified, and a lot of fallacies promulgated. Those facts and fallacies are what this book is about.

There’s a problem with those facts–and, as you might imagine, those fallacies. Many of these fundamentally important facts are learned by a software engineer, but over the short lifespan of the software field, all too many of them have been forgotten. While reading Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering, you may experience moments of “Oh, yes, I had forgotten that,” alongside some “Is that really true?” thoughts.

The author of this book doesn’t shy away from controversy. In fact, each of the facts and fallacies is accompanied by a discussion of whatever controversy envelops it. You may find yourself agreeing with a lot of the facts and fallacies, yet emotionally disturbed by a few of them! Whether you agree or disagree, you will learn why the author has been called “the premier curmudgeon of software practice.”

These facts and fallacies are fundamental to the software building field–forget or neglect them at your peril!


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 662 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 224 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Jusqu'à 5 appareils simultanés, selon les limites de l'éditeur
  • Editeur : Addison-Wesley Professional; Édition : 1 (28 octobre 2002)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B001TKD4RG
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Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5 43 commentaires
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Facts and fallacies that everyone who works in the software industry should know 11 décembre 2013
Par alejandro claro - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This is a short and very easy book to read. The intesion the Robert Glass is very clear. Its purpose is to list 55 made ​​in the software industry that many people do not know (especially business people ) and 10 (5 + 5) fallacies you hear often to justify bad decisions (especially business people).

The topics in the book do not go into details, however Glass provides many references to articles of origin, controversy or discussion where you can delve deeper into each fact or fallacy.

As Glass emphatically indicates, it is possible that you are not agree with some of the topics , but that does not make them any less interesting. Sometimes it seems he need go deeper on the arguments, but you can search in the references for details.

In the book you will not find anything original or new. Basically it's a compilation of these facts and fallacies discussed by many authors over the last 30 years.

I really recomend this book, even if you have a notion of the facts and fallacies in the book. It worth reading and have a handy reference list when you want to go deeper or when you want to recommend someone to read a specific topic.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Insightful and Painful 2 mai 2008
Par Isaac Z. Schlueter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This book covers all the mistakes we know about, but keep on making regardless.

When it arrived in the mail, I was amazed by how small this book was. It's a short read, but every section is brilliantly distilled to the bare essentials.

I've worked on several different teams developing software. There was very little in this book that came as a surprise. Every point seemed obvious, though in many cases, I was amazed by the wealth of research that Glass was able to cite to make his points. From the bankruptcy of hypesters to the importance of a work environment, Glass states the obvious with compelling and refreshing clarity.

The "painful" part was realizing that at some point in my career, I've made almost every mistake he highlights.

I found the tongue in cheek nature of the writing to be a bit much at times. That is my only complaint, and it's not so bad as to be unreadable.

It probably won't make you a better programmer, but the knowledge in this book will provide magnificent insight into all the non-coding aspects of software development that we so often overlook. Human nature hasn't changed, and software will always be complex. The facts and fallacies he cites truly are fundamental, and will be with us forever.

This book has given me a vocabulary with which to confront the absurd that we see every day in the world of software. Hopefully, I can now be a part of the solution rather than a part of the problem. Thank you, Dr. Glass!
6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Lots of good starting points 9 décembre 2004
Par wiredweird - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Glass is an opinionated old coot, not afraid to speak his mind no matter what the source of the silliness he sees around him. These aren't the deepest thoughts on the business, craft, and engineering of software, but they cover a lot of important ground. Best, these aphorisms come from hard-won experience in many areas. I don't disagree with any of them, but I have to qualify my agreement in a few places.

For example, #32: "It is nearly impossible to test software at the level of 100% of its logic paths." I'd go farther and say it's usually dangerous even to try. If some pointy-haired manager decides that more coverage is better, programmers will dutifully optimize that metric. Error recovery is hard to test, so they'll edit out the error recovery. Integrity checks may be hard to trigger, so the integrity checks have to go. Trust me, this is not an improvement.

Or #51: "Residual errors will always persist." No argument there. "The goal should be to minimize or eliminate severe errors." That's one good goal, but there are lots of systems where the goal should be to continue service in the presence of errors, via error recovery, some fail-soft state, or other means. Even perfect software may violate its contract in the presence of hardware errors: given a one-in-a-billion error rate and 3GHz clock, errors happen three times per second. Even at one-per-trllion, they happen every five minutes or so.

Also, #46, a prioritized list of "-ilities" that define quality. Of course I disagree with his or any order. Heck, in one system I worked on, four different subsystems had four different lists. Reliability was paramount in one area - software failure would have to be repaired by unsoldering and replacing a chip. Other subsystems variously emphasized speed, compiled code size, and user-friendliness. In the bulk of the system, maintainability was at the top of the list (a fifth different priority list).

Although I generally like the content and style, a few things might have strengthened the book. Glass' favorite author, based on citation counts, is Glass. He's good, but so are other authors. This book isn't really self-contained. Lots of discussions are cursory (and he sometimes points that out), requiring a lot more elaboration of his part or a lot of reference-chasing time on the reader's part, assuming the reader can find the references at all.

Still, this is a welcome comment on the current state of affairs in software development. His one point - if there is only one - is that it's the same state we were in back in the 70s. Only the buzzwords have really changed. That point I agree with.

//wiredweird
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Against common wisdom 4 novembre 2005
Par Ugo Cei - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Here's another short book (195 pages) that cannot be missing from a good software engineer's personal library. Robert L. Glass condenses in 55 facts and 10 fallacies - some of them well known, others more controversial - his vast knowledge of the field.

The 55 facts are subdivided into four main sections:

1. About management

2. About the Life Cycle

3. About Quality

4. About Research

The ten fallacies are instead grouped as follows:

1. About Management

2. About the Life Cycle

3. About Education

This organization could provide a hint as to what sections of the book you'd better read first if you are managing programmers rather than if you're more involved in coding. But in any case, I suggest that whatever your positions, you will be better served by reading it all.

Glass, a member of the "old guard" of software engineering, having been a practitioner of the field since its very beginnings, is a bit wary of espousing the latest trends in software, like eXtreme Programming. Some of his facts and fallacies fly right in the face of some XP principles and practices. See for instance fallacy nr. 3:

Programming can and should be egoless.

How can you reconcile this with collective code ownership and pair programming?. In other instances, he shares some of XP's convictions. See for instance fact 28:

Design is a complex, iterative process. Initial design solutions are usually wrong and certainly not optimal.

In the end, no matter what development process you like best, you're bound to find some controversial statements inside this book. If this makes you think about what you're doing and how successful you're being at it, I think the book will have fulfilled its purpose. By being apparently dogmatic in its format (what sounds more dogmatic than a list of asserted "facts"?) Glass manages to teach us that what you should be avoiding mostly is indeed dogma. In the current climate, dogma typically takes the form of a new development methodology that promises to end all debates on methodology. To fight this, everyone should memorize fallacy 5:

Software needs more methodologies.

Highly recommended!
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Practical advice for new and experienced software engineers alike 29 octobre 2013
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering is a strong read presented in an organized, concise manner that only a software engineering practitioner can do. Here you may learn a few things, or you may find yourself thinking "I knew that... I just forgot!" The author brings many years of experience to bear to discuss software engineering practices, quality, software management, and more. An excellent read.
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