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Ghostly Apparitions - German Idealism, the Gothic Novel, and Optical Media (Anglais) Relié – 6 septembre 2013

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Description du produit

Ghostly Apparitions Drawing together literature, media, and philosophy, Ghostly Apparitions provides a new model for media archaeology. Stefan Andriopoulos examines the relationships between new media technologies and distinct cultural realms, tracing connections between Kant's philosophy and the magic lantern's phantasmagoria, the Gothic novel and print culture, and spiritualist research and the invention of televis... Full description

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3.0 étoiles sur 5 A Ghost of a Book? 15 décembre 2015
Par Orson Welles - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
It appears that _Ghostly Apparitions_ wants to be a book. Stefan Andriopoulos appears to want to make an argument. Although he is occasionally lucid, he never clarifies either what he is doing--media archaeology?--or why. The closest he comes is saying that he wants to make up for an omission. But something like a ghost keeps getting in Andriopoulos's way. Andriopoulos at times appears to be hallucinating while scrupulously arguing that Hegel, for example, "alludes" (that verb does a lot of work, standing in for an absent analysis of allude to something can effectively be the same thing as overtly mentioning it, pp.52 68; "it may be" is also employed; pp. 79; 81) to a discourse about phantasmagoria "without naming it" (pp. 67; 69). The first two chapters offer something like deconstructive commentary on Kant, Fichte, Schopenhauer, in addition to Hegel. Here we get some truly brilliant insights. Rather than advancing an argument, however, Andriopoulos keeps circling back to Kant, pairing Kant with another philosopher, then another, making essentially the same point over and over again. Events writing is structurally repetitive. Andriopoulos uses "by contrast" again and again (three times on p. 61; pp.62, 66, ("in stark contrast," pp. 81; 83) He repeats the same quotation from Kant again and again, sometimes aware he is doing so ( "cited before" 75; "to quote one more time," 80). Something strange is happening here that could not be sorted out if the book were to be edited better. The occasional misjudgments--repeating the argument of the first chapter in the first two pages of chapter three as if it the argument were being made for the first time, again, and lapses in the writing--incoherent paragraphs, the repetition of adjectives like "increasing" and "explosive" to describe "print culture,"(pp. 80-81 among others, evince, as far as I can see, a struggle to address the relation between optical media, German Idealism, and Gothic novel without doing historically (note the shifts from past to present tense and related use of the word "anticipates" to assert a temporal relation) or philosophically or theoretically (the avoidance of the word "figure" is telling; it is used just once) or psychoanalytically (see Neil Herz, The End of the Line). Andriopoulus doesn't seem to understand that one man's logical contradiction can be another's paradox. In the absence of a critical vocabulary, or perhaps it would be better to say "in the presence of an cobbled, ad hoc critical sounding vocabulary," Andriopoulos repeats the repetitions he himself notices in the texts he reads, and notices repeatedly ("repeatedly," p. 43; "again and again," p.45; "again contrasts," 78). At other times, he quotes the same sentence or phrase he did a page or so earlier without seeming to be aware of it. (See pp. 76-79, for example.) He sometimes relates a point almost verbatim on a facing page or the same page. Andriopoulos's notion of optical media is close to Benjamin's optical unconscious, but Andriopoulos never mentions him. He does devote a page to Friedrich Kittler's _Discourse Networks_ (p.144) along with some preemptory and occasionally snarky endnotes, but he oddly passes over primary and secondary sources that wold seem to be central to his project. Foremost among these is E.T.A. Hoffman's "The Sandman," a story about optics that Andriopoulos mentions only in passing. Freud's essay "The Uncanny" disappears (repetition compulsion, anyone? optics?). Derrida's _Specters of Marx_ is mentioned and summarily dismissed. De Man's work on Kant and Schiller doesn't rate a mention. And Ronell and Rickels are M.I.A. I don't want to be unfair. I've learned a lot from the book, and the endnotes alone are worthwhile. And all of the problems I have noted, quite apart fro Andriopoulos's apparent lack of appreciation for irony and humor, testifies to the powerful disturbances in thinking ghosts exert in German idealism in more and more bizarre ways. But Andriopoulus doesn't see to be able to a variation of the hermeneutic circle and so ends up in a conceptual vortex of his own making. The work required to read _Ghostly Apparitions_ with the attention it demands but does not reward, will mean, it appears to me, that few readers will actually read it. I find that a bit haunting. Btw, I highly recommend Malicious Objects, Anger Management, and the Question of Modern Literature. The book covers some of the same material as Ghostly Apparitions and appeared a year earlier. I think Kreienbrock and Andropoulos should get in touch. But even if they don't, their books are already linked.
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