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Go Like Hell: Ford, Ferrari, and Their Battle for Speed and Glory at Le Mans par [Baime, A. J.]
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Go Like Hell: Ford, Ferrari, and Their Battle for Speed and Glory at Le Mans Format Kindle


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Format Kindle, 17 juin 2010
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EUR 88,40 EUR 32,78

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

"All I can say is: Wow! Go Like Hell drops you right smack in the middle an intense and ferocious battle between Ford and Ferrari in the 1960s. Baime's exceptional voice puts the reader into minds of the drivers, designers, and executives who formed the Golden Age of racing; his fantastic descriptions allow the reader to feel the pounding of the cylinders. If you like cars—nay, if you have ever seen a car—you must read this book!"
Garth Stein, New York Times bestselling author of The Art of Racing in the Rain
 
"Light up a Lucky Strike. Pour yourself a good stiff drink. Go Like Hell is a wonder, chock-a-block with great heroes and villains, a pedal-to-the metal account of greed and gumption, a chronicle of obsession and vain glory. Don't worry about that seat belt. Just go for the ride." 
  —Leigh Montville, author of The Big Bam, Ted Williams and At the Altar of Speed

"Go Like Hell is an epic. Ambitions, lives, fortunes, friendships, and a place in history--all are on the line here.  A.J. Baime marvelously reveals the people behind the machines."
Neal Bascomb, author of The Perfect Mile and Hunting Eichmann
 
"Mix sport, death and big business, the biggest.  Throw in vivid portraits of  Enzo Ferrari and Henry Ford II,  and the drivers, men obsessed with speed and fast cars while trying not to get killed. Go Like Hell is a very hard book to put down. Sharp and suspenseful from beginning to end."
Robert Daley, author of The Cruel Sport and Year of the Dragon
 
"Baime’s skillful reporting and introspective writing style make for an insightful portrait of two automobile legends, as well as an exciting account of a bygone era in racing and in American culture."
Publishers Weekly

"Turbo-charged look at the heated race-car rivalry between Ferrari and Ford... Baime’s rich descriptions of the card lift them to near-human proportions. The ultimate speed-read." 
Kirkus Reviews

"A remarkably intimate look into the famous 1960s Ford-versus-Ferrari battles at Le Mans."
Automobile

"Like the cars it describes, Go Like Hell is a streamlined marvel built for speed, fueled by testosterone and likely to elicit happy grins from anyone who has ever heard music in the squeal of a tire or the roar of an engine . . . [Baime] hits the gas, pops the clutch and takes readers on a red-blooded ride to glory that will have them smiling all the way to the checkered flag."  —Dallas Morning News

"A pleasure to read . . . chronicles a time when an unfettered Detroit, led by 'car guys,' could achieve great things." -- Wall Street Journal

"Henry Ford II’s monumental effort to topple Enzo Ferrari from the summit of sports-car racing at Le Mans is vibrantly told in this fast-paced account of the clash between the two fearsome, hyper-competitive automotive titans." – Bloomberg

"Insightful, well written accounts of the events and people involved along with inspired detail regarding the vehicles makes for a page turner. This is an ideal book for gear-heads, automotive enthusiasts, historians and people who might find amazing symmetry in what happened over 40 years ago verses what is happening today." -- Denver Examiner
 
"Engaging... Grips you from the early pages to the conclusion." -- Autoweek



"All I can say is: Wow! Go Like Hell drops you right smack in the middle an intense and ferocious battle between Ford and Ferrari in the 1960s. Baime's exceptional voice puts the reader into minds of the drivers, designers, and executives who formed the Golden Age of racing; his fantastic descriptions allow the reader to feel the pounding of the cylinders. If you like cars—nay, if you have ever seen a car—you must read this book!"
Garth Stein, New York Times bestselling author of The Art of Racing in the Rain
 
"Light up a Lucky Strike. Pour yourself a good stiff drink. Go Like Hell is a wonder, chock-a-block with great heroes and villains, a pedal-to-the metal account of greed and gumption, a chronicle of obsession and vain glory. Don't worry about that seat belt. Just go for the ride." 
  —Leigh Montville, author of The Big Bam, Ted Williams and At the Altar of Speed

"Go Like Hell is an epic. Ambitions, lives, fortunes, friendships, and a place in history--all are on the line here.  A.J. Baime marvelously reveals the people behind the machines."
Neal Bascomb, author of The Perfect Mile and Hunting Eichmann
 
"Mix sport, death and big business, the biggest.  Throw in vivid portraits of  Enzo Ferrari and Henry Ford II,  and the drivers, men obsessed with speed and fast cars while trying not to get killed. Go Like Hell is a very hard book to put down. Sharp and suspenseful from beginning to end."
Robert Daley, author of The Cruel Sport and Year of the Dragon
 
"Baime’s skillful reporting and introspective writing style make for an insightful portrait of two automobile legends, as well as an exciting account of a bygone era in racing and in American culture."
Publishers Weekly

"Turbo-charged look at the heated race-car rivalry between Ferrari and Ford... Baime’s rich descriptions of the card lift them to near-human proportions. The ultimate speed-read." 
Kirkus Reviews

"A remarkably intimate look into the famous 1960s Ford-versus-Ferrari battles at Le Mans."
Automobile

"Like the cars it describes, Go Like Hell is a streamlined marvel built for speed, fueled by testosterone and likely to elicit happy grins from anyone who has ever heard music in the squeal of a tire or the roar of an engine . . . [Baime] hits the gas, pops the clutch and takes readers on a red-blooded ride to glory that will have them smiling all the way to the checkered flag."  —Dallas Morning News

"A pleasure to read . . . chronicles a time when an unfettered Detroit, led by 'car guys,' could achieve great things." -- Wall Street Journal

"Henry Ford II’s monumental effort to topple Enzo Ferrari from the summit of sports-car racing at Le Mans is vibrantly told in this fast-paced account of the clash between the two fearsome, hyper-competitive automotive titans." – Bloomberg

"Insightful, well written accounts of the events and people involved along with inspired detail regarding the vehicles makes for a page turner. This is an ideal book for gear-heads, automotive enthusiasts, historians and people who might find amazing symmetry in what happened over 40 years ago verses what is happening today." -- Denver Examiner
 
"Engaging... Grips you from the early pages to the conclusion." -- Autoweek

Présentation de l'éditeur

By the early 1960s, the Ford Motor Company, built to bring automobile transportation to the masses, was falling behind. Young Henry Ford II, who had taken the reins of his grandfather’s company with little business experience to speak of, knew he had to do something to shake things up. Baby boomers were taking to the road in droves, looking for speed not safety, style not comfort. Meanwhile, Enzo Ferrari, whose cars epitomized style, lorded it over the European racing scene. He crafted beautiful sports cars, "science fiction on wheels," but was also called "the Assassin" because so many drivers perished while racing them.

Go Like Hell
tells the remarkable story of how Henry Ford II, with the help of a young visionary named Lee Iacocca and a former racing champion turned engineer, Carroll Shelby, concocted a scheme to reinvent the Ford company. They would enter the high-stakes world of European car racing, where an adventurous few threw safety and sanity to the wind. They would design, build, and race a car that could beat Ferrari at his own game at the most prestigious and brutal race in the world, something no American car had ever done.

Go Like Hell
transports readers to a risk-filled, glorious time in this brilliant portrait of a rivalry between two industrialists, the cars they built, and the "pilots" who would drive them to victory, or doom.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1595 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 321 pages
  • Editeur : Mariner Books; Édition : Reprint (17 juin 2010)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003K16PBY
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.7 étoiles sur 5 397 commentaires
64 internautes sur 67 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Go Like Hell to your bookstore (or just click above) 1 juin 2009
Par Jack - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I found an advanced copy of this at my buddy's place, I don't much like racing, but I forgot my iPod and needed something to look at on the train so I figured, what the Hell.

I couldn't put it down when I got off the subway; it's the best book I've read in years. I think it's billed incorrectly as a story about racing. To me it read as a compelling fight between two strong and very different characters (Mr. Ford and Mr. Ferrari). Ford represents the young gun in big business while Ferrari is the elder artisan. The two men could have been toothpick saleseman for all I cared. The magic was how AJ Baime cinematically recreated their war. It was the clash of the titans but instead of being fought on a battlefield it unfolded on a racetrack (though I was surprised by the amount of casualties involved).

Anyways whether or not you are a gearhead if you like character driven non-fiction you'll enjoy this. I have never reviewed a book but I figured many non-NASCAR folk might miss out on a good read.
15 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent Overall Complete Story 2 août 2009
Par Michael Shoen - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
This is the best overall complete story of the Ferrari-Ford battles of the 1960s that I have read. It does not include much detail on the '67 season and the '68-'69 J.W.E efforts, but it covers the origins and years through '66 wonderfully. Especially good are the portraits of Henry Ford II, Enzo Ferrari, Phil Hill, John Surtees, Ken Miles, and Carroll Shelby. Other characters, like John Wyer and Bruce McLaren are well drawn. Baime also describes the industry environment pretty well. When people ask me to list the best books on this era, I name Levine's "Dust and Glory", Wyer's "The Certain Sound", Horseman's "Racing In The Rain", Evan's "Ken Miles", my book, Friedman's "Ford GT-40", Cahier's "Pit Stops" and now Baime's book. Nice job and worth the read for anyone who loves the sport or enjoys exciting (and true) stories.
16 internautes sur 19 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Stunning look at the Ford/Ferrari rivalry at Le Mans in the 1960s 16 novembre 2009
Par DangerousK - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Here in America, most people think the Daytona 500 and the Indianapolis 500 are the 2 biggest auto races out there. To those people I say, "Not so fast." The Grand Prix d'Endurance les 24 Heures du Mans (24 Hours of Le Mans) is the greatest single race in the world as it pushes a car to the absolute limits. It's also a race that as a child, I had a hard time believing that a single race would go on for 24 hours. I thought it was insane, and even now I still think it is to some degree. This book focuses on probably the most interesting period of Le Mans, and the struggle of Ford in trying to win the race outright.

A.J. Baime has written a detailed and engaging history outlining how and why the Ford Motor Company became so driven in trying to ultimately win Le Mans. The need to sell more cars was often achieved through racing victories as seen with the dominance of NASCAR by the Ford Galaxie. Le Mans dominance by Ferrari through the early 1960s also translated into sales of customer cars. There was the belief that if a manufacturer's vehicle won at Le Mans, the company must know how to build cars that can last, as well as having power.

The story that unfolds shifts between the Ferrari side and the Ford side. We get to meet the big names of the automotive world like Henry Ford II, Enzo Ferrari, and Carroll Shelby. Then we get the foundation for why Henry Ford II became so obsessed with winning at Le Mans. It would take 3 tries before his goal was fully realized in 1966. Subsequently the GT40 would dominate Le Mans in 1967, 1968, and 1969 to close out the decade. In between that we are told stories about many of the greatest race drivers that the world has ever seen ranging from men like Bruce McLaren to Phil Hill to Mario Andretti. What makes the story so engaging for the reader is Baime's ability to make the reader truly understand what was going on in the sports car racing world during the 1960s, and it certainly doesn't hurt that we get to know many of the individuals.

When reading this book, it becomes clear why auto racing these days will never match the "golden age" of racing during the 1950s and 1960s. Racing was a glorious thing, and the cars were simply machines meant to go fast. While we could debate the obvious stupidity in retrospect of the lack of car safety, it's the very lack of safety that makes this era so appealing. You had to have somewhat of a death wish to get behind the wheel of a Le Mans race car or a Formula One car. The amount of drivers killed during races is astounding, but what might be more astounding is how accepted it was. Safety was viewed as being unmanly so there were no great pushes towards it. Drivers tended to be surrounded by fuel, and things we take for granted now like seatbelts were an after-thought then. But what is just as amazing is how with the technology of those days, they were able to achieve speeds in excess of 200MPH on the famed Mulsanne Straight. Equally amazing, are driver reactions to the race cars reaching these insane speeds.

With the end of the 1960s, the golden age started to pass, but it would linger on in the early 1970s with the Porsche 917. For those who love reading about the GT40, the Porsche 917 story is one I suggest checking out. For as fast as the GT40's were, the 917 was even faster hitting 246MPH on the Mulsanne Straight. In fact one driver was reported as saying when he had to start braking for the Mulsanne Corner, the 917 was still accelerating.

This book is highly recommended for all racing enthusiasts, and even those with a passing interest in automotive racing or even automotive history, as the story itself is unlike any other out there. The Ford-Ferrari rivalry is one of the greatest stories in automotive history, and this book does that story justice.
15 internautes sur 19 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 le magnifique 30 juin 2009
Par G.Milliken - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
While watching the 2009 Le Mans race Bob Varsha and the boyz from Speed had A.J. Baime as a guest in the broadcast booth. Before the night was over, I was on Amazon and the book was on its way.

As a fan of road racing and F1, this was a great read, fast paced with a great mix of the personalities and race accounts that it involved. An automotive Who's Who list of amazing proportions. I would recommend it to anyone. Given the state of the auto industry, it is also somewhat timely, with Ford looking to rise from the ashes once again as a company and Ferrari searching for answers to its dismal 2009 F1 campaign.

The reason for only four stars? There's no half stars and I thought it strange that while the research for the book seems extensive, a foot note on page 175 states, "* Andretti's (Mario) third son, Marco, today a top Indy-car competitor, was not yet born.", he still hasn't been. Marco is Mario Andretti's grandson, a fact that could be verified any weekend an IRL race is being run.

This minor inaccuracy should in no way deter anyone from reading this book.
7 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Half a Story 18 août 2012
Par Gromit801 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Why in the world does the book bill itself as the battle between Ford and Ferrari, and leave out the final act? It's a good read up through the 1966 season.... then stops. Kind of like the ending of the motion picture "The Birds" where the cast just walks away, leaving you going "Huh?" Without telling the story of the 1967 season, the development of the Ford J-Car and Mk.IV, the Ferrari 330 P4, and the Chaparrals, it's half a book.

A better book would be Leo Levine's "Ford: The Dust and the Glory."
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