Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 13,26

Économisez
EUR 5,14 (28%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

The H.G. Wells Reader: A Complete Anthology from Science Fiction to Social Satire par [Huntington, John]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

The H.G. Wells Reader: A Complete Anthology from Science Fiction to Social Satire Format Kindle


Voir les 3 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 13,26

Longueur : 498 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

This collection, the first of its kind, indicates the full breadth of Well's visionary views and social commentary.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2413 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 498 pages
  • Editeur : Taylor Trade Publishing; Édition : 1st (9 juin 2003)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00C65N3RY
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Lecteur d’écran : Pris en charge
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : Soyez la première personne à écrire un commentaire sur cet article
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°874.426 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  • Voulez-vous nous parler de prix plus bas?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoile

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 3.3 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 A Fine Introduction 28 février 2005
Par Larry Sinclair - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I come to this reader having read a few Wells novels: "War of the Worlds", "The Invisible Man", "The Time Machine". I didn't know much else about Wells' life or career. In reading this anthology, I found out quite a few new things, though not enough to claim that I'm an expert on the subject. Wells did live a long time, and this anthology uses a lot of space presenting things about Wells that I alreay knew. I know that Bison Books prints editions of "The Sleeper Awakes", "In The Days of the Comet", and "The Last War." The other reviewers of this book seem to miss the point that this book is meant to be an introduction. And an introduction is supposed to have a range and also be complete. A figure like Wells may be impossible to encapsulate in such a small volume, but I think for new readers, this might be the book for you. If you want to know the roots of science-fiction, where else can you look but at the master himself?
7 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 woefully incomplete 25 novembre 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
One hopes that by "complete" the publisher refers to the inclusion of Wells' diverse prose throughout his career and not to the selections the editor has chosen for this edition. The only saving grace of this anthology is that it reproduces some of Wells' work that is currently out of print. Really, you'd be better off heading to the library and reading "Boon" and "Aniticpations" than reading the meager selections included here. Such is the case with most of this stinker.
The anthology is increadibly lopsided: too much "In the Days of the Comet" and not enough of Wells' early or later social writings; too much of the currently in-print "classic" Wells and not enough of Wells' out-of-print larks like "Bealby." Logically, the reading public does not need a "reader" of books that are available either for free through electronic media or wonderfully cheap in mass market paperbacks. The *idea* of this book has an audience...but in its execution, one wonders precisely who this "reader" is for!
For a man who wrote at least a book a year for nearly 50 years, one would think that an anthology would be able to cover some of the dynamism, range, contradictions, and joys of such a long and often controversial career. But you won't find dynamism here. This volume is poorly selected, and is, as a result, a terrible "portrait of the artist." It is barely readable, and certainly less than teachable.
For what it's worth, keep away from this dog of a book.
3 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A TERRIFIC COLLECTION 27 avril 2004
Par AMY GREEN - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I didn't know very much about Wells beyond THE TIME MACHINE and THE WAR OF THE WORLDS (which I've only encountered via the movie versions) until a friend gave me a copy of this terrific collection. It was great to have almost three complete novels by him as well as other selections in one volume. The excerpts made me want to read the whole of THE FOOD OF THE GODS, THE WHEELS OF CHANCE, and TONO-BUNGAY. There's not a poor choice in this book. Including the majority of IN THE DAYS OF THE COMET (not available elsewhere as one reader states) makes sense to me, since it seems like such an important book-bridge between his science fiction and social novels. The editor also includes most of THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON, which manages to be wildly imaginative, beautifully written, incredibly hilarious, and deeply chilling, often in the same paragraph. There's so much other great stuff in this anthology, which is a bargain at $14. The editor's comments were very helpful in placing the selections within Wells' creative growth and intent, and in placing Wells within the broader context of his day. I can't understand the venom of some of the other reader responses. Do they have some personal grudge against the editor? Perhaps they were former students and he graded them poorly. You'd think Wells was their grandmother and they were defending her honor. Wells speaks for himself quite well, I think. And the truth is if Wells' later stuff is so outstanding, and its absence worthy of being bemoaned and bitched about, why is it mostly all out of print? I'm definitely going to check out later Wells, but wouldn't be doing so without this marvelous introduction to spur me on.
3 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A TERRIFIC COLLECTION 27 avril 2004
Par Michael Dorr - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I didn't know very much about Wells beyond THE TIME MACHINE and WAR OF THE WORLDS (which I've only encountered via the movie versions) until a friend gave me a copy of this terrific collection. It was great to have almost three complete novels by him as well as other selections in one volume. The excerpts made me want to read the whole of THE WHEELS OF CHANCE, THE FOOD OF THE GODS, and TONO-BUNGAY. There's not a poor choice in the book. Including the majority of IN THE DAYS OF THE COMET (not available elsewhere as one reader states) makes sense to me, since it seems like such an important book-bridge between his science fiction and social novels. The editor also includes most of THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON, which manages to be wildly imaginative, beautifullly written, incredibly hilarious, and deeply chilling, often in the same paragraph. There's so much other great stuff in this anthology, which is a bargain at $14. The editor's comments were also very helpful in placing the selections within Wells' creative growth and intent, and in placing Wells within the broader context of his day. I can't understand the venom of some of the other reader responses. Do they have some personal grudge against the editor? You'd think Wells was their grandmother and they were defending her honor. Wells speaks for himself quite well, I think. And the truth is if Wells later stuff is so outstanding, why is it mostly all out of print? I'm defintely going to check out later Wells, but wouldn't be doing so without this marvelous introduction to spur me on.
4 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I AM ABSOLUTELY SHOCKED 25 avril 2004
Par Michael Dorr - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I am absolutely shocked by the strident, outrageous, and embarrassingly ignorant responses of these readers (who, by the way, lack the courage to sign their indictments and condemnations). If some "invisible" critics don't even want their names attached to their own reviews, where's the value? I urge prospective readers to ignore these Griffens. No anthology can adequately represent a literary career as long and prolific as that of Wells, who wrote 1,000+ pages of short stories, dozens of novels and nonfiction works, hundreds of articles, and thousands of letters and public statements, not to mention the autobiographical and scientific writings. Saying the task is similar to anthologizing Dickens or Trollope is entirely inaccurate, since the breadth and quality of their nonfiction output was negligible comparative to their fiction, whereas Wells was one of the most astute, far-wandering, and all-encompassing intellectual and imaginative forces of his day. Right from the start, Huntington ought to be applauded for being bold enough even to attempt such an endeavor (Huntington's audacity and admiration Wells would surely appreciate). One of these critics says: "One wonders precisely who this 'reader' is for!" NO. One wonders if these "critics" spent enough time from penning their own masterpieces of destruction for their own sake to actually peruse the editor's introduction and prefaces to his selections. These critcs are eviscerating this anthology because it doesn't correspond to their own "inner" collections. Huntington clearly define THE H. G. WELLS READER as an introduction, i.e. for someone who is either totally unfamiliar with Wells or for someone who might think of him as having only "written that Martian book." In 496 pages the editor does a commendable job of presenting Wells. Not the entirety of Wells, which is impossible to accomplish in even a 1,000-page anthology (not the hot trend nowadays in publishing). But Huntington explains his intentions and criteria and even admits the unavoidable limitations inherent in any collection: "I have selected the texts for this anthology with an eye for quality and to what I see as the central issues and styles of Wells. In the case of such a prolific and varied artist, there is danger of dispersal and dilution. I have therefore confined the selection strictly to fiction." That seems as cogent and clear as any manifesto I've encountered. Huntington continues: "I have also narrowed this selection by limiting it to work Wells published in the first decade and a half of his writing career. Later Wells is a fascinating area [obviously the editor has read the totality of Wells prodigiously], but only to readers who already have a sense of what early Wells is about. If I have emphasized the scientific romances, it is with a sense of how it leads into social novels like TONO-BUNGAY [excerpted] and THE HISTORY OF MR. POLLY." Why critique the editor for including readily available work after praising him for not neglecting "work that is out of print." Shouldn't that be the range and purpose of introductory readers? In fact, even that reproach is misleading. A hefty portion of THE H. G. WELLS READER is gathered from currently o.p. works. of which the editor includes nearly all of two novels (THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON and IN THE DAYS OF THE COMET, the former only recently reprinted by Modern Library) and one complete novel (THE HISTORY OF MR. POLLY, presently unavailable from a U.S. publisher) as well as a sampling of short stories (including the masterpieces "Aepyornis Island" and "The Country of the Blind," two of Wells's most perfect and haunting tales). IN THE DAYS OF THE COMET is not now available. The editor also excerpts the excellent yet unfortunately o.p novels THE WHEELS OF CHANCE and THE FOODS OF THE GODS. Easily two-thirds of this collection is unavailable elsewhere. Where one would expect Huntington to include all or gigantic chunks of THE TIME MACHINE, he has selected a previously excised and startling episode of the Time Travellor's travels not in many editions. How can an editor not include a healthy dose from Wells's masterpiece, THE WAR OF THE WORLDS? Key events on Moreau's island and from Griffen's psychic deterioration are also represented. One would expect Morlocks, Beast People, and Invisibly Inspired Mischief to abound, but, refreshingly, one encounters an anarchist, Selenites, and the incomparable Mr. Polly. Not bad for 496 pages. If one accepts the editor's view of Wells as a genius and satirist of society and the human condition, then this reader suddenly exhibits a critical strategy and brilliant architectural arc. No longer is it a potpourri of science fiction and mockery of social mores, but an evolution of Wells's satire from its guise as science fiction to its heartfelt and radical comedic critique of contemporary society. I'd prefer reading anything in this anthology than such mediocre Wells's "larks" as BOON and BEALBY. Another critic states that "Wells is a fugitive in the history of the novel and a questionable presence in the development of social sciences." WHAT? "Fugitive in the history of the novel." What does that nonsense mean? He was one of the forerunners, not among the fugitives. No one was hunting H. G. Wells. Certainly not George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, Jules Verne, or Upton Sinclair. Not even, as far as I can ascertain, Tommy Lee Jones. A questionable presence in the development of social sciences? WHAT? Wells's radical theories, accurate predictions, and prescient and resonant insights proved crucial to many scientific disciplines, both "hard" and "soft," from biology to sociology and futurism. "It doesn't tantalize prospective readers." Should that be the purpose of readers? Methinks, this anonymous cowardly lion mistakes books for burlesques. Both "reviewers" are slamming this work for not following their preferred and personal table of contents, which is entirely unjust. If one wishes to find fault with THE H. G. WELLS READER, one might critique it for not having a larger page count (thereby making possible the inclusion or more stories or excerpts from later novels) or a better proofreader. Instead, these "reviewers" snipe for what's not there, rather than responding to the formidable introduction and succinct and priceless prefaces. I challenge anyone to compose a better biographical, aesthetic, and critical profile in under ten pages than what Hujtington manages in his introduction. This collection doesn't stink, just the supposedly informed "critics." Kudos, kudos, kudos to Huntington. Only wish it could've been longer.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous