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Hatching Twitter (English Edition) par [Bilton, Nick]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

Hatching Twitter (English Edition) Format Kindle

4.5 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires client

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Format Kindle, 5 novembre 2013
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Longueur : 321 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

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#START

October 4, 2010, 10:43 A.M.
The Twitter Office

Get out,” Evan Williams said to the woman standing in his office doorway. “I’m going to throw up.”

She stepped backward, pulling the door closed, a metal clicking sound reverberating through the room as he grabbed the black wastebasket in the corner of his office, his hands now shaking and clammy.

This was it. His last act as the CEO of Twitter would be throwing up into a garbage can.

He knelt there for a moment, his dark jeans resting on the rough carpeted floor, then leaned back against the wall. Outside, the cold October air rustled the trees that lined Folsom Street below. Violin-like noises of traffic mingled with a muffled din of conversation near his office doorway.

Moments later, someone informed his wife, Sara, who also worked at Twitter, “Something is wrong with Ev.” She rushed up to his corner office, her rich, black, curly hair wobbling slightly as she walked.

Sara checked her watch, realizing that Ev had only forty-five minutes before he would have to address the three hundred Twitter employees and break the news. She opened the door and went inside.

Down the hall, the Twitter public-relations team reviewed the blog post that would go up on the Web site at 11:40 A.M., the moment Ev would finish addressing the company and hand the microphone to the new CEO, passing power in a gesture as simple as handing off the baton in a relay race.

The blog post, which would be picked up by thousands of press outlets and blogs from around the world, gleefully announced that Twitter, the four-year-old social network, now had 165 million registered people on the service who sent an astounding 90 million tweets each day. Five paragraphs down, it noted that Evan Williams, the current CEO, was stepping down of his own volition.

“I have decided to ask our COO, Dick Costolo, to become Twitter’s CEO,” said the post, allegedly written by Ev.

Of course, that wasn’t true.

Ev, seated on the floor of his office with his hands wrapped around a garbage can, had absolutely no desire to say that. A farmer’s son from Nebraska who had arrived in San Francisco a decade earlier with nothing more than a couple of bags of cheap, raggedy, oversized clothes and tens of thousands of dollars in credit-card debt, Ev wanted to remain chief of the company he had cofounded. But that wasn’t going to happen. It didn’t matter that he was now worth more than a billion dollars or that he had poured his life into Twitter. He didn’t have a choice: He had been forced out of the company in a malicious, bloody boardroom coup carried out by the people he had hired, some of whom had once been his closest friends, and by some of the investors who had financed the company.

Ev looked up as he heard Sara come in. He wiped the sleeve of his sweater across the dark stubble on his chin.

“How are you feeling?” Sara asked.

“Fuck,” he said, unsure if it was his nerves or if he was coming down with something. Or both.

Down the hall, through the doors that led to the Twitter office’s main foyer, copies of the New Yorker, the Economist, and the New York Times were fanned out on the white square coffee table in the waiting area. Each publication contained articles about Twitter’s role in the revolutions now taking place in the Middle East—rebellions that, through Twitter and other social networks, would eventually see the fall of dictators in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen and spark massive protests in Bahrain, Syria, and Iran.

Around the corner, Biz Stone, another of Twitter’s four cofounders, finalized an e-mail telling the employees that there would be an all-hands meeting in the cafeteria at 11:30 A.M. Attendance was mandatory; no guests were allowed. There would be no hummus, just important news. He hit “send” and stood up from his desk, heading for Ev’s office to try to cheer up his friend and boss of nearly a decade.

Jason Goldman, who oversaw Twitter’s product development and was one of Ev’s few allies on the company’s seven-person board, was already sitting on the couch when Biz arrived and dropped down next to him. Ev was now quietly sipping from a bottle of water, despondently staring off into the distance, the turmoil and madness of the past week playing over in his mind.

“Remember when . . . ,” Goldman and Biz chorused, trying to cheer Ev up with humorous memories of the last several years at Twitter. There were lots of stories to tell. Like the time Ev had nervously been a guest on the Oprah Winfrey Show, fumbling in front of millions of viewers. Or the time the Russian president showed up to the office, with snipers and the Secret Service, to send his first tweet, right at the moment the site stopped working. Or when Biz and Ev went to Al Gore’s apartment at the St. Regis for dinner and got “shit-faced drunk” as the former vice president of the United States tried to convince them to sell him part of Twitter. Or other bizarre acquisition attempts by Ashton Kutcher at his pool in Los Angeles and by Mark Zuckerberg at awkward meetings at his sparsely furnished house. Or when Kanye West, will.i.am, Lady Gaga, Arnold Schwarzenegger, John McCain, and countless other celebrities and politicians had arrived, sometimes unannounced, at the office, rapping, singing, preaching, tweeting (some others were even high or drunk), trying to understand how this bizarre thing that was changing society could be controlled and how they could own a piece of it.

Ev struggled to smile as his friends spoke, trying his best to hide the sadness and defeat on his face.

There was one person who might have been successful at making Ev smile: the man who was now pacing in the office directly next door, his bald head bowed, his phone cupped to his ear. Dick Costolo, once a well-known improv comedian who had graced the stage with Steve Carell and Tina Fey. The same Dick Costolo Ev had “decided to ask” to become Twitter’s new CEO, the third of a company that was only four years old.

Yet Dick wasn’t in a jovial mood either. He was talking to the board members who had been involved in the coup, confirming the wording of the blog post that would soon go out to the media, and also what he would say to the hundreds of Twitter employees when he took the mic from Ev.

He paced as they plotted what would happen next: the return of Jack Dorsey.

Jack had been the first CEO of Twitter and another cofounder. He had been pushed out of the company by Ev in a similar power struggle in 2008. On this particular morning, he’d been expecting to make a triumphant return to the company he had obsessively built before his own ousting.

As Jack had been informed by the board a few hours earlier, though, his return to Twitter would not happen today; it would be delayed again. Jack was only a few blocks away as the scene unfolded that morning, pacing in his office at Square, a mobile payments company he’d recently started.

He had woken up in his wall-to-wall-concrete penthouse apartment in Mint Plaza and dressed for work in his now-signature several-thousand-dollar outfit of fancy Dior shirt, dark suit blazer, and Rolex watch. It was a very different ensemble from the unkempt T-shirt and black beanie hat he had worn two years earlier when he was ousted from Twitter.

But although he wore a different uniform that morning, he was equally disdainful of Ev, his once friend and forever cofounder, who had foiled Jack’s planned return to Twitter. Although Ev had been successfully removed as the CEO, he had not, as was originally supposed to unfold, been publicly fired from the company. At least not yet.

Back in the Twitter office, Ev looked up as the clock approached 11:30 A.M. Time to go.

Ev had no idea that within just a few months he would be completely out of a job at Twitter. Biz and Jason followed Ev out the door and down the halls, as they had for years, clueless that they would also be pushed out of the company in due time.

They walked silently toward the company’s cafeteria, past the colorful walls and white sleigh rocking chairs and the confused employees who were grabbing their seats. None of Twitter’s staff members knew what they were about to hear from their beloved boss, Evan Williams. They had no idea that the company they worked for, a company that had changed the world in countless ways, was itself about to change forever.




From the Hardcover edition.

Revue de presse

“Fast-paced and perceptive.”

--The New York Times Book Review


 

"Exhaustively researched...extensively detailed...unexpectedly addictive."

--The Wall Street Journal


 

"#Backstabbing, power struggles and profanity laid bare"– "It is breathless storytelling"

--The New York Times


 

"Deeply reported and deliciously written."

--The Verge


 

"A compelling read, more like espionage than a corporate history."

--Fortune Magazine


 

“With a cinematic approach befitting its eclectic cast of characters, the perceptive read…is rife with Byzantine-like intrigue, character clashes and broken dreams.”

--USA Today


 

“Nick Bilton’s impressively detailed fly-on-the-wall exposé of the micro-blogging site’s birth and evolution evokes all the titillating elements of a soap opera.”

-Success Magazine


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2461 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 321 pages
  • Editeur : Sceptre (5 novembre 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00CTMAAKW
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  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.5 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires client
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Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Alors que Twitter a aujourd'hui sa place dans nos habitudes de communication, que nous avons suivi son évolution au cours des années et que nous pourrions penser très bien connaître la vie de cette petite startup devenue phénomène mondial (et introduite à Wall Street cette semaine), ce livre nous en révèle les vrais coulisses.
Nick Bilton nous entraîne dans une saga technologique digne de Dallas, mêlant amitiés et trahisons, égos et luttes de pouvoirs, glam et quotidien, en collant au plus près des faits.

On apprend beaucoup sur Twitter dans ce livre, mais aussi plus généralement sur les obstacles qui peuvent se dresser sur le chemin d'une startup de l'idée originale à son avènement.

En bref, un livre passionnant, à lire absolument si le monde des startups, ou simplement Twitter, vous intéresse (ou si vous étiez fan de Dallas).
Remarque sur ce commentaire 3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
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J'ai acheté le livre car Fred Wilson, un venture capitalist, investisseur de Twitter indiquait que le récit était le plus proche de la réalité qu'il avait vécue lors de la création de Twitter.

Le livre démarre par dresser le portait des créateurs de Twitter bien avant sa création.
Ensuite s'en vint un véritable scénario digne de Dallas pour ceux qui s'en souviennent.

Le livre est écrit tel la série 'Lost': l'auteur décrit la 'fin de l'histoire duchapitre' puis le chapitre démarre vraiment pour se refondre et vous faire comprendre le 'début' de l'histoire du chapitre.

Il faut avouer que 4-5 chapitres sont inutiles à l'histoire comme la venue de Dmitri Medvedev alors Président la Russie ou la naissance d'un des enfants d'un des membres fondateurs.

Je parie pour qu'une série télévisée soit produite vu la manière dont le livre est écrit.

Un très bon livre qui vous apprendra que la création d'une entreprise dans la silicon valley est faite de bonheurs, trahisons, erreurs stratégiques et opérationelles qui sont loin des croyances partagées dans des livres comme 'lean startup'.

Je recommande la lecture!
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Fabuleuse aventure que celle de la start-up Twitter, on y a raconte ici ses origines, d'une bande de "coders/hackers/bras cassés/idéalistes/anarchistes/fêtards/reveurs", de la naissance de Blogger revendu à Google, puis de Odeo société de podcasts à la naissance à Twitter.

Mais surtout on réalise que c'est à la base une bande de très bons copains qui vont vite se poignarder dans le dos, pour le pouvoir, et l'argent (société évaluée à 100 milliards selon le livre...).
Fêtes mémorables, trahisons, investisseurs, rachats, stars, politique, médias font de cette aventure de geeks une expérience unique.
Et surtout on y apprend que Jack Dorsey, le patron charismatique des médias n'est pas le seul inventeur...

Vive l'envers du décor !
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