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Commentaire: Parfaitement conservé, comporte dans certains cas des signes minimes trahissant sa précédente utilisation. Expédié depuis le cœur de la campagne britannique, ce livre quittera notre bibliothèque dans un jour ou deux après réception de votre commande et sera disponible chez vous dans peu de temps.
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House Unauthorized: Vasculitis, Clinic Duty, and Bad Bedside Manner (Anglais) Broché – 11 octobre 2007

3,3 étoiles sur 5
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3,3 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires provenant des USA

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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 3.3 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Its about House.... what could possibly be wrong? Except of course "Everybody Lies" 2 juin 2014
Par Psych 611 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Great book. I love anything about House that can give me any insight into things I don't know. I have seen every episode at least several times, yet this book helps me understand things even further. House was a one of a kind character and there will never be a show that could be anything like it. If you are a "House, M.D." fan, you will enjoy reading this.
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Silly 12 juillet 2013
Par Jenn - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I didn't know what to expect with this book, but it's really a waste of time, even for a huge "House" fan like me.
1 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Unauthorized for a Reason 12 janvier 2011
Par Anne Bassoon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This book absolutely sucks! It is nothing but a compilation of essays written by people who were probably and therefore begrudgingly turned down for a writing position for the show. Or possibly these essays were a writing assignment where they were asked to find fault with the show and, since it is so well done, the tiniest, most insignificant detail is focused upon and magnetized, thus appearing, if only to each author, as though it were an actual fault. It's a shame that these people are cashing in on the name "House." It's no wonder it's "unauthorized!"
36 internautes sur 36 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Interesting analysis of the show and characters. 18 mai 2008
Par MaliaLoke - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
House Unauthorized is broken down into four sections: essays about the show, essays about House as a character, essays about the psychology of House's character, and essays about the other characters. I found the essays in the first two sections a bit weaker than the others, although there were some gems. On the show as a whole, the argument about critical audiences and the rare moments House tries to dumb itself down in "That Was A Ten" is interesting, as was the look at House's character from a British viewer's perspective. The rest of the second section consists largely of essays comparing House to other well-known characters: M*A*S*H's Hawkeye Pierce and Sherlock Holmes.

There are several essays in the latter half of the book that I found particularly interesting. "How House Thinks" is a breakdown of the methodology employed by real-world doctors in diagnosing diseases, and how/why House's techniques are comparable to or illustrative of the typical highly-experienced medical professional. "House Calls" uses cognitive psychological research to discuss why House's theories and diagnoses are so often accurate. "But Can He Teach?" analyzes how House influences and teaches Cameron, Chase, and Foreman throughout the first three seasons of the show. "Does God Limp?" discusses how House's chronic pain affects his psychology and diagnostic skills.

This book is definitely intended for people who enjoy thinking critically. That said, it's not a difficult or boring read by any means.
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 As piercingly intelligent as Doctor House himself. 30 juillet 2009
Par Sean C. OConnor - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
This book is an excellent dissection and critical discussion of the qualities that make House not merely a popular show, but rather, what makes the character of Gregory House so intriguing. While a few of the essays suffer from a degree of sameness regarding the subject matter, two of the standouts are the "Art of the Bastard" essay by Karen Traviss, and "Does God Limp?" by James Gilmer.

'Bastard' shows us House as seen from the UK, where sarcastic, smug, intelligent anti-heroes may be thick on the ground, while compassionate thorough medical care as shown at the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital assuredly is not. While most of the characters in House may refer to House as a 'bastard who's the best there is at his job', to paraphrase, Traviss provides a strong argument that when you get down to it, House really isn't a bastard at all.

'Limp' delves into the issue of chronic pain, which on the show is used as a counterpoint to the usual 'God Complex' that gifted TV doctors seem to invariably develop. Aside from his impatience with the meaningless social niceties that people expect, House also is in pain, all the time, and has to find ways to function - at a higher level than many of us would ever be capable of. Many of the behaviors that House's coworkers write off as lazy, immature, or quirky are, Gilmer explains, not uncommon methods of coping with chronic pain patients. While most of us are passingly familiar with varying degrees of pain, very few of us are at all familiar pain that can not be relieved, only temporarily dulled. For being allegedly brilliant doctors, very few of House's coworkers seem to have any recognition of the symptoms or treatment of chronic pain.

If you buy the book for those two essays alone, you will not be disappointed, but while those stuck out the most, many of the others offer good insight into the making of a character, of a TV drama series, and in the grounding of the people who bring it to life.
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