D'occasion:
EUR 52,75
+ EUR 2,79 (livraison en France métropolitaine)
D'occasion: Très bon | Détails
Vendu par tousbouquins
État: D'occasion: Très bon
Commentaire: Expédié par avion depuis Londres; prévoir une livraison entre 8 à 10 jours ouvrables. Satisfait ou remboursé
Vous l'avez déjà ? Vendez sur Amazon

King Lear [Import anglais]

3.8 étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires client

Voir les offres de ces vendeurs.
2 neufs à partir de EUR 65,99 2 d'occasion à partir de EUR 52,75

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?


Détails sur le produit

  • Acteurs : Paul Scofield, Irene Worth, Cyril Cusack, Susan Engel, Tom Fleming
  • Réalisateurs : Peter Brook
  • Scénaristes : Peter Brook, William Shakespeare
  • Producteurs : Michael Birkett, Mogens Skot-Hansen, Sam Lomberg
  • Format : PAL, Import
  • Audio : Italien (Dolby Digital 1.0), Anglais (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Sous-titres : Grec, Hongrois, Italien, Anglais
  • Sous-titres pour sourds et malentendants : Anglais
  • Région : Région 2 (Ce DVD ne pourra probablement pas être visualisé en dehors de l'Europe. Plus d'informations sur les formats DVD/Blu-ray.).
  • Rapport de forme : 1.33:1
  • Nombre de disques : 1
  • Studio : UCA
  • Date de sortie du DVD : 6 juin 2005
  • Durée : 137 minutes
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.8 étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires client
  • ASIN: B0009IZR7E
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 89.394 en DVD & Blu-ray (Voir les 100 premiers en DVD & Blu-ray)
  •  Voulez-vous mettre à jour des informations sur le produit, faire un commentaire sur des images ou nous signaler un prix inférieur?

Commentaires en ligne

3.8 étoiles sur 5
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Meilleurs commentaires des clients

Format: DVD Achat vérifié
Cette adaptation de 1971 par Peter Brook avec Paul Scofield dans le rôle du Roi Lear est ma version favorite de toutes les versions que j'ai vues. C'est non seulement une adaptation fidèle de la pièce de Shakespeare, mais une véritable oeuvre d'art à part entière, un film en noir et blanc qui souligne bien l'aspect existentialiste de la tragédie représentée. Aucun manichéisme, mais une plongée au fond des ténèbres de l'insoutenable, avec un Edmund particulièrement ambigu et attirant.
Remarque sur ce commentaire 5 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
thanks, as expected. delivery in time. nothing more to say (but have to write twenty words at least, it seems).
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
Ce produit est en effet intéressant si l'on veut aborder Shakespeare. Il permet d'avoir une idée visuelle de cette pièce et la découverte du jeu des acteurs donne envie de lire le scénario initial. C'est excellent!
Remarque sur ce commentaire Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
cette version de King Lear n'est pas conforme à la pièce : la fin est modifiée, Goneril tue sa soeur en la frappant contre un rocher et elle se suicide après de la même manière.
L'acteur de Lear est très bien sinon
mais le cadre est assez bizarre, le château n'a pas vraiment l'air d'en être un, on dirait qu'ils sont dans une vieille ferme.
Si vous voulez suivre la pièce (livre en main) c'est pas le film idéal
Remarque sur ce commentaire 3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5 21 commentaires
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A CLEAR AND LUCID MOVIE ABOUT THE AGELESS DRAMA OF SHAKESPEARE 12 mars 2012
Par Deniza Futuro - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
This rare movie of Peter Brooks,made in the 80's, is rarely mentioned in the reviews about the cinematographic adaptations of King Lear. But the director is a genius and the interpretation of Paul Scofield as the ageing king that divides his kingdom between his two elders daugthers and disowns his younger daughter because she could not say that she loved him above all things is one of the best! Scofield plays a Lear that is in the beggining of the movie magestic but not so coleric as many later productions show him. The actresses that play the two elder daughters are superb, the younger daughter has more time in screen than in the other adaptations and the tender dialogues between the mad king and Cordelia are more emphatized here. The stark scenario and the black-and-white color make the movie even more pungent and the dramatic movements of the background (the people, that rarely can be displayed in the theater form) make scenes without dialogues very beautiful. King Lear is a very complex character and each actor imprints his own set of values when interpreting the old senile King that rages, cries and claims against the gods about the ingratitude of his daugters. The performances of Gloucester, Edmund, Edgar and the other minor characters, as well as the Fool and Kent are very good. But the very best is still the kind and dazed aspect of Lear that Scofield presents and that side is not present in other representations of this play. A pity that this DVD is only available in Region 2 format because I think the americans would like very much to watch a brilliant adaptation of this famous play of Shakespeare by the director Peter Brooks.
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Without Question the Best Lear on Film 17 janvier 2010
Par farington - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Cassette vidéo Achat vérifié
I first saw this film back when it was on the art house cinema circuit--1973 or so--when I was still an impressionable youth. I was so taken with it I saw it 3 or 4 times while it was still running at the local cinemas. Since that time I've seen a number of productions of Lear, both film and stage, but have always felt that something was missing; that, while good, they never matched the power and profundity of this Peter Brook production. I wondered if this feeling was just residue from an overheated youthful enthusiasm, so I recently resolved to view the film again. Getting my hands on a copy wasn't easy; it appears to have essentially disappeared from distribution, available mostly in used VHS format. I eventually did secure a used copy in good shape from an Amazon seller. I fired it up in the old VCR, and...it's not just as good as I remember, it's better. Scofield is a complete virtuoso, supple in his expression while tapping a deep, profound reserve of slowly building tragic suffering. Honestly, as much as I enjoy Olivier, when it comes to Lear, Scofield simply overwhelms him. In the scene on the heath during the storm, when Lear goes mad, Scofield erupts with unearthly moans and howls that seem to come from some primal recess of the soul. The austere black-and-white cinematography is stunning and it, along with the bleak landscape, adds to the pervasive atmosphere of loss, groundlessness and chaos. It's still the best production of Lear I've ever seen. Highly recommended, even if it means shelling out what seems like an exhorbitant amount for a VHS tape.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 King Lear 27 juillet 2011
Par Ronald Brady - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
The most distinguished King Lear that I have had the priviledge of experiencing. Scofield's portrayal of the King who "knew himself only slenderly" Is as compelling and cathartic an experience as any Shakespeare ever produced. This is the essence of great art. Not to be missed-a soul altering experience.
2 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 One of the Greats 11 juin 2010
Par G. Hughes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
Paul Scofield has made a habit of appearing in magnificent, but critically so-so adoptions of the Bard. No matter what the critics say, I found Branagh's Harry V of the highest order, and Scofield's Charles VI second only to Brian Blessed's outrageous Exeter. But in this, there is no-one else. It is Scofield going slowly Troppo to Peter Brooks' bleak Black & White, storm lashed direction. Both are utterly enthralling to watch. I first saw this because the Australian High School syllabus used to force one to study Dead White Men like Willy Waggledagger for one's Higher School Certificate, and I was too lazy, and way too clever, to waste my time reading ancient tripe like this, so I went and saw the movie instead. I discovered a genius who spoke to the ages from 500 years ago. Now my children are encouraged to study 'texts', preferably by a minority feminist, to achieve understanding of the human condition. I weep for such foolishness.
7 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Peter Brook's Bergmanesque KING LEAR. 12 juin 2010
Par Chip Kaufmann - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
The great Ingmar Bergman never got around to directing KING LEAR, but if he had the results might have looked something like this. Peter Brook, whose original stage production was influenced by the "theatre of cruelty" theories of Antonin Artaud, transferred that bleak outlook boldly unto film in this stark black and white version which was shot entirely on location in Denmark. The extremely strong cast includes Irene Worth, Patrick Magee, Alan Webb, Jack MacGowran as the Fool and the inimitable Paul Scofield as the misguided Lear. Borrowing a page from Charles Laughton's 1956 Lear performance at Stratford, Scofield takes a quiet, smoldering approach to the character which clearly shows a man who is used to being in control so he doesn't have to shout. The famous mad scene is underplayed as Lear internalizes his rage and frustration at what has happened to him. Running water on the camera lens brilliantly indicates the dissolution of his mind. The blinding of Gloucester, done from his point of view, is harrowing. The staging of Kent in the stocks, Edgar and Edmund's final confrontation and Goeneril's brutal death, help to drive home this bleakest of all Shakespeare plays.

I first saw this movie when it first came out in the early 1970s in the wake of a rash of Shakespearean movies spurred on by the success of Zeferelli's ROMEO & JULIET. It was a slap to the face, a punch to the gut and I have never forgotten it. I always envisioned it as part of a double bill along with Roman Polanski's bloody color version of MACBETH which was shot on location in Wales and released the same year (1971). No one would leave the theater the same as when they came in. While Polanski's MACBETH is readily available, a Region 1 version of KING LEAR has yet to be issued. If you wish to see it, then you'll need to get an all region player. Then you can try out the twin bill for yourself in the comfort and sanctuary of your own home. This is certainly not a LEAR to everyone's taste but it is certainly the most cinematic especially when compared with the much better known Olivier version. The text has been shortened and altered but unless you're very familiar with the play, you wouldn't be able to tell. Once seen, Scofield's Lear cannot be forgotten so let's hope that a Region 1 release will appear before too long. This is a performance for the ages and it deserves to be better known. When you watch be sure and use the subtitles.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?