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The Lady In The Lake New Edition (Anglais) Broché – 1 novembre 1999

3.5 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires client

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Private detective Philip Marlowe is looking for the wife of Derace Kinglsey. Is she dead or not? Is she the lady in the lake?

A tale of murder and betrayal from the American master of crime fiction. A classic thriller.

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3.5 étoiles sur 5
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Format: Format Kindle
Few modern readers know that Raymond Chandler spent his formative years (12-24) in England and returned to the US with a posh British accent. Also, according to Frank MacShane’s standard biography, that Chandler disliked California deeply wherever he and his wife lived-usually in furnished rooms-because of its lack of culture and the collusion between its politicians, law enforcement and criminals fronting as e.g. casino owners. And because old Britain recognized his unique crime novels as literature, long before critics in the US did.
All Chandler novels contain English idiom and values (chivalry, fairness, good manners). Here, he refers to a policeman as a ‘constable’. Marlowe’s repeated reply “I should imagine so” to a cop’s questions completely baffles the latter. The venue of chapter 17 is pure White’s in London, not the Athletic Club in LA. Otherwise, Raymond Chandler surely made a lasting impact on crime- and screenwriting with his language use, based on common West Coast speech of people belonging to different sections of society. Philip Marlowe in a voice entirely his own, informs the reader about his ongoing investigations. Finally, unlike most real and fictional private eyes of the era, Marlowe does not do divorce work.
Here, he is hired (at $25 pd plus expenses) to locate the whereabouts of his client’s wife, who walked out on him a month ago. No sign of life since. Marlowe proceeds to her last known abode, the couple’s lakeside cabin and soon
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It would be good to precise that it is not the integral text, but a simplified one, LEVEL 2 (Elementary).
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 4.2 étoiles sur 5 6 commentaires
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Probably better to read it quickly to keep up with the ... 22 août 2014
Par Raghav Bhandari - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
A bit too chaotic for a first time reader. Probably better to read it quickly to keep up with the pace.
0 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 The Lady of the Lake 13 juillet 2013
Par Marcia Graetz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Great book
I love the language the author used in this book.

The way the author describes the scene is different from anything I've read before. You could imagine the investigator thinking like that. It was like listening to an old movie the way the scenes were described.

I really enjoyed it.

I also liked they way that it wasn't predictable and it had twists at the end.

The detective character was like a part that would be played by an actor like Humphrey Bogart.

Great book
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Superb 15 décembre 2014
Par Sid Nuncius - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I have just re-read this for probably the 6th or 7th time, but I hadn't read it for at least a decade. It is still quite brilliant, and the pleasure of reading such a superbly written, engrossing and humane novel is undimmed by either familiarity or time. The plot is gripping and the first person narration is an absolute masterclass in how to do it.

I think Chandler was a truly great writer of English. Marlowe has the tough one-liners and smart comebacks, of course, but he also has wonderful, meditative passages on the human condition which you hardly notice as being meditative because they are so well done. Marlowe is, under the hard-boiled exterior, a moral and humane man with a deep understanding of people which enables him to get to the heart of things and it is this which makes Chandler's books stand out as fine novels as well as first-class detective stories.

The other aspect of Chandler's sheer brilliance is his characterization. Everyone, even the most minor of characters, is drawn convincingly and with immense skill. They generally seem to paint their own portraits through what they say and do rather than a lot of the laborious psychological theorising which can get so tiresome in lesser detective novels. For example, Jim Patton, the Constable (effectively sherrif) of a small mountain county is a creation of genius, I think.

Few people will need an endorsement from me to persuade them to read a Chandler novel, but I would recommend this very warmly indeed. Plot, place and characters are all brilliantly done: it is, quite simply, superb.
4.0 étoiles sur 5 The Case of the Runaway Wife 22 octobre 2013
Par Acute Observer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche
The Lady in the Lake, Raymond Chandler

Derace Kingsley works for a cosmetics company and wants to locate his missing wife. Philip Marlowe is given the job. Crystal sent a telegram saying she was going for a Mexican divorce. But Chris Lavery doesn't know anything. Across the street Dr. Almore watches Marlowe. So Marlowe drives to Little Fawn Lake to inspect Crystal's last known location. He talks to the caretaker Bill Chess, and learns Chess' wife Muriel left him the same day. They walk around the lake and onto the little pier. There is something below the water, Chess' missing wife is found (Chapter 6)! Sheriff Patton questions Bill Chess (Chapter 8). Birdie Keppel, the part time newspaper reporter, talks to Marlowe. Six weeks earlier a man was looking for a woman whose photograph resembled Muriel (Chapter 9). Sheriff Patton knew his country and where to look. Muriel's car was hidden away in shed (Chapter 11). Marlowe searched the cabin again and found a clue (Chapter 12).

Marlowe returned to talk to Lavery, but he wasn't home. A woman came up the steps, talked to Marlowe, then ran out. Marlowe then found Lavery, but he didn't say anything (Chapter 16). We learn more about Dr. Almore's wife and local politics (Chapter 19). The police arrive at Lavery's house (Chapter 21). Marlowe gets another lead (Chapter 22). The parents of Dr. Almore's dead wife tell Marlowe about their suspicions (Chapter 23). He hears the name "Mildred" as Dr. Almore's missing nurse. We learn more facts about the case (Chapter 28). Marlowe brings money to Crystal and learns what happened (Chapter 31). Then he is knocked out (Chapter 32).Crystal won't talk now. The police arrive but Marlowe left before this. Marlowe tells Lt. Degarmo what he surmised about Mildred and what she did (Chapter 36). There is more about Crystal's fate (Chapter 38)! Marlowe surmises what happened when Crystal and Muriel both disappeared at the same time (Chapter 39). Marlowe guesses what happened when he was sapped and receives confirmation of his guess (Chapter 40). There is an end to the mystery (Chapter 41). It will be kept out of the newspapers.

Having read more than a few mystery novels I picked up on the clue where two women disappeared at the same time, and both looked similar. Mistaken identity was often used by Erle Stanley Gardner in his many novels. This story reminded me of "The Case of the Screaming Woman" as a story about life among the rich and powerful. It also reminded me of the novel "Farewell, My Lovely", and the short story "No Crime in the Mountains". A mistaken identification is part of Dashiell Hammett's "Golden Horseshoe" short story. Note how the villains are not the usual suspects of the poor and lower class of society.
4.0 étoiles sur 5 The Case of the Runaway Wife 22 octobre 2013
Par Acute Observer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
The Lady in the Lake, Raymond Chandler

Derace Kingsley works for a cosmetics company and wants to locate his missing wife. Philip Marlowe is given the job. Crystal sent a telegram saying she was going for a Mexican divorce. But Chris Lavery doesn't know anything. Across the street Dr. Almore watches Marlowe. So Marlowe drives to Little Fawn Lake to inspect Crystal's last known location. He talks to the caretaker Bill Chess, and learns Chess' wife Muriel left him the same day. They walk around the lake and onto the little pier. There is something below the water, Chess' missing wife is found (Chapter 6)! Sheriff Patton questions Bill Chess (Chapter 8). Birdie Keppel, the part time newspaper reporter, talks to Marlowe. Six weeks earlier a man was looking for a woman whose photograph resembled Muriel (Chapter 9). Sheriff Patton knew his country and where to look. Muriel's car was hidden away in shed (Chapter 11). Marlowe searched the cabin again and found a clue (Chapter 12).

Marlowe returned to talk to Lavery, but he wasn't home. A woman came up the steps, talked to Marlowe, then ran out. Marlowe then found Lavery, but he didn't say anything (Chapter 16). We learn more about Dr. Almore's wife and local politics (Chapter 19). The police arrive at Lavery's house (Chapter 21). Marlowe gets another lead (Chapter 22). The parents of Dr. Almore's dead wife tell Marlowe about their suspicions (Chapter 23). He hears the name "Mildred" as Dr. Almore's missing nurse. We learn more facts about the case (Chapter 28). Marlowe brings money to Crystal and learns what happened (Chapter 31). Then he is knocked out (Chapter 32).Crystal won't talk now. The police arrive but Marlowe left before this. Marlowe tells Lt. Degarmo what he surmised about Mildred and what she did (Chapter 36). There is more about Crystal's fate (Chapter 38)! Marlowe surmises what happened when Crystal and Muriel both disappeared at the same time (Chapter 39). Marlowe guesses what happened when he was sapped and receives confirmation of his guess (Chapter 40). There is an end to the mystery (Chapter 41). It will be kept out of the newspapers.

Having read more than a few mystery novels I picked up on the clue where two women disappeared at the same time, and both looked similar. Mistaken identity was often used by Erle Stanley Gardner in his many novels. This story reminded me of "The Case of the Screaming Woman" as a story about life among the rich and powerful. It also reminded me of the novel "Farewell, My Lovely", and the short story "No Crime in the Mountains". A mistaken identification is part of Dashiell Hammett's "Golden Horseshoe" short story. Note how the villains are not the usual suspects of the poor and lower class of society.
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