Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 4,68

Économisez
EUR 2,60 (36%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Longbourn par [Baker, Jo]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

Longbourn Format Kindle

3.9 étoiles sur 5 11 commentaires client

Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 4,68
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 146,61 EUR 142,37

Polars Polars


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter II
 
‘Whatever bears affinity to cunning is despicable.’
 
They were lucky to get him. That was what Mr B. said, as he folded his newspaper and set it aside. What with the War in Spain, and the press of so many able fellows into the Navy; there was, simply put, a dearth of men.
 
A dearth of men? Lydia repeated the phrase, anxiously searching her sisters’ faces: was this indeed the case? Was England running out of men?
 
Her father raised his eyes to heaven; Sarah, meanwhile, made big astonished eyes at Mrs Hill: a new servant joining the household! A manservant! Why hadn’t she mentioned it before? Mrs Hill, clutching the coffee pot to her bosom, made big eyes back, and shook her head: shhh! I don’t know, and don’t you dare ask! So Sarah just gave half a nod, clamped her lips shut, and returned her attention to the table, proffering the platter of cold ham: all would come clear in good time, but it did not do to ask. It did not do to speak at all, unless directly addressed. It was best to be deaf as a stone to these conversations, and seem as incapable of forming an opinion on them.
 
Miss Mary lifted the serving fork and skewered a slice of ham. ‘Papadoesn’t mean your beaux, Lydia – do you, Papa?’
 
Mr B., leaning out of the way so that Mrs Hill could pour his coffee, said that indeed he did not mean her beaux: Lydia’s beaux always seemed to be in more than plentiful supply. But of working men there was a genuine shortage, which is why he had settled with this lad so promptly – this with an apologetic glance to Mrs Hill, as she moved around him and went to fill his wife’s cup – though the quarter day of Michaelmas was not quite yet upon them, it being the more usual occasion for the hiring and dismissal of servants.
 
‘You don’t object to this hasty act, I take it, Mrs Hill?’
 
‘Indeed I am very pleased to hear of it, sir, if he be a decent sort of fellow.’
 
‘He is, Mrs Hill; I can assure you of that.’
 
‘Who is he, Papa? Is he from one of the cottages? Do we know the family?’
 
Mr B. raised his cup before replying. ‘He is a fine upstanding young man, of good family. I had an excellent character of him.’
 
‘I, for one, am very glad that we will have a nice young man to drive us about,’ said Lydia, ‘for when Mr Hill is perched up there on the carriage box it always looks like we have trained a monkey, shaved him here and there and put him in a hat.’
 
Mrs Hill stepped away from the table, and set the coffee pot down on the buffet.
‘Lydia!’ Jane and Elizabeth spoke at once.
 
‘What? He does, you know he does. Just like a spider-monkey, like the one Mrs Long’s sister brought with her from London.’
 
Mrs Hill looked down at a willow-pattern dish, empty, though crusted round with egg. The three tiny people still crossed their tiny bridge, and the tiny boat crawled like an earwig across the china sea, and all was calm there, and unchanging, and perfect. She breathed. Miss Lydia meant no harm, she never did. And however heedlessly she expressed herself, she was right: this change was certainly to be welcomed. Mr Hill had become, quite suddenly, old. Last winter had been a worrying time: the long drives, the late nights while the ladies danced or played at cards; he had got deeply cold, and had shivered for hours by the fire on his return, his breath rattling in his chest. The coming winter’s balls and parties might have done for him entirely. A nice young man to drive the carriage, and to take up the slack about the house; it could only be to the good.
 
Mrs Bennet had heard tell, she was now telling her husband and daughters delightedly, of how in the best households they had nothing but manservants waiting on the family and guests, on account of every- one knowing that they cost more in the way of wages, and that there was a high tax to pay on them, because all the fit strong fellows were wanted for the fields and for the war. When it was known that the Bennets now had a smart young man about the place, waiting at table, opening the doors, it would be a thing of great note and marvel in the neighbourhood.
 
‘I am sure our daughters should be vastly grateful to you, for letting us appear to such advantage, Mr Bennet. You are so considerate. What, pray, is the young fellow’s name?
 
‘His given name is James,’ Mr Bennet said. ‘The surname is a very common one. He is called Smith.’
 
‘James Smith.’
 
It was Mrs Hill who had spoken, barely above her breath, but the words were said. Jane lifted her cup and sipped; Elizabeth raised her eyebrows but stared at her plate; Mrs B. glanced round at her house- keeper. Sarah watched a flush rise up Mrs Hill’s throat; it was all so new and strange that even Mrs Hill had forgot herself for a moment. And then Mr B. swallowed, and cleared his throat, breaking the silence.
 
‘As I said, a common enough name. I was obliged to act with some celerity in order to secure him, which is why you were not sooner informed, Mrs Hill; I would much rather have consulted you in advance.’
 
Cheeks pink, the housekeeper bowed her head in acknowledgement.
 
‘Since the servants’ attics are occupied by your good self, your husband and the housemaids, I have told him he might sleep above the stables. Other than that, I will leave the practical and domestic details to you. He knows he is to defer to you in all things.’
 
‘Thank you, sir,’ she murmured.
 
‘Well.’ Mr B. shook out his paper, and retreated behind it. ‘There we are, then. I am glad that it is all settled.’
 
‘Yes,’ said Mrs B. ‘Are you not always saying, Hill, how you need another pair of hands about the place? This will lighten your load, will it not? This will lighten all your loads.’
 
Their mistress took in Sarah with a wave of her plump hand, and then, with a flap towards the outer reaches of the house, indicated the rest of the domestic servants: Mr Hill who was hunkered in the kitchen, riddling the fire, and Polly who was, at that moment, thumping down the back stairs with a pile of wet Turkish towels and a scowl.
 
‘You should be very grateful to Mr Bennet for his thoughtfulness, I am sure.’
 
‘Thank you, sir,’ said Sarah.
 
The words, though softly spoken, made Mrs Hill glance across at her; the two of them caught eyes a moment.
 
‘Thank you, sir,’ said Mrs Hill.
 
Mrs Bennet dabbed a further spoonful of jam on her remaining piece of buttered muffin, popped it in her mouth, and chewed it twice; she spoke around her mouthful: ‘That’ll be all, Hill.’
 
Mr B. looked up from his paper at his wife, and then at his housekeeper.
 
‘Yes, thank you very much, Mrs Hill,’ he said. ‘That will be all for now.’

Revue de presse

A Best Book of the Year Selection: New York Times 100 Notable, Seattle Times, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, Kirkus Reviews
 
“Rich, engrossing, and filled with fascinating observations. . . . If you are a Jane Austen fan . . . you will devour Jo Baker’s ingenious Longbourn.”
O, The Oprah Magazine

“Original and charming, even gripping, in its own right.”
The New York Times Book Review

“Masterful.”
The Miami Herald

“A witty, richly detailed re-imagining. . . . Fans of Austen and Downton Abbey will take particular pleasure in Longbourn, but any reader with a taste for well-researched historical fiction will delight in Baker’s involving, informative tale.”
People

“A bold novel, subversive in ways that prove surprising, and brilliant on every level.”
USA Today

“Delightful.” 
The New Yorker

“A triumph: a splendid tribute to Austen’s original but, more importantly, a joy in its own right, a novel that contrives both to provoke the intellect and, ultimately, to stop the heart.”
The Guardian (London)

“[A] fitting tribute, inventing a touching love story of its own.”
The Wall Street Journal

“A freshly egalitarian reimagining.”
Vogue

“[Baker’s] writing style draws admirably from Austen’s.”
—Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Engaging and rewarding.”
The Washington Times

Longbourn is told with glee and great wit.”
The Daily Beast

“The Bennet family’s servants imagined by Baker have richly complicated lives and loyalties. . . . Baker deserves a bouquet. . . . Refreshing.”
The Seattle Times

“There’s a finale so back-of-the-hand-to-the-forehead romantic, someone should render it in needlepoint.”
Entertainment Weekly

“Excellent. . . . In Sarah the housemaid, Baker has created a heroine, living in the same house as Elizabeth Bennet, who manages to shine despite Elizabeth’s long literary shadow.”
Christian Science Monitor

“Lively. . . . Baker’s vivid passages about the natural world, working conditions and even of sorrow are . . . well detailed and articulated.”
The Plain Dealer

Longbourn is a really special book, and not only because its author writes like an angel. . . . There are some wildly sad and romantic moments; I was sobbing by the end. . . . Beautiful.” —Wendy Holden, Daily Mail (London)

“Inspired. . . . This is a genuinely fresh perspective on the tale of the Bennet household. . . . A lot of fun.” 
Sunday Times (London)

“This clever glimpse of Austen’s universe through a window clouded by washday steam is so compelling it leaves you wanting to read the next chapter in the lives below stairs rather than peer at the reflections of any grand party in the mirrors of Netherfield.” 
Daily Express (London)

“Impressive. . . . An engrossing tale we neither know nor expect.” 
Daily Telegraph (London)

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1735 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 354 pages
  • Editeur : Transworld Digital (15 août 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00CQ1D3BY
  • Synthèse vocale : Non activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.9 étoiles sur 5 11 commentaires client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°8.958 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Voulez-vous faire un commentaire sur des images ou nous signaler un prix inférieur ?


Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

3.9 étoiles sur 5
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Meilleurs commentaires des clients

Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Pour tous ceux qui aiment Orgueil et préjugés ! Ce roman permet d'entendre les ombres de l'ouvrage de Jane Austen : les domestiques qui n'apparaissent que ponctuellement (on se souvient surtout de Mrs Hill...). Ici ils sont les personnages majeurs, ce sont eux les protagonistes de l'intrigue romanesque construite par Jo Baker et on s'attache à Sarah, la jeune servante dont l'âge est le même que celui des soeurs Bennett mais dont la condition en est très éloignée.
Une approche originale donc d'Orgueil et Préjugés dont on retrouve la trame mais du côté jardin !
Un livre à conseiller donc...
Remarque sur ce commentaire 3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Upstairs Downstairs, Downton Abbey, et bien d'autres séries, films ou romans nous montrent à quel point nos amis anglais aiment se pencher sur la cohabitation de deux mondes sous le même toit, celui des aristocrates et celui de leurs domestiques.
Jo Baker a eu l'idée de re-écrire "Pride and Prejudice" (Orgueil et Préjugés") du point de vue des quelques domestiques de la maison des Bennet, appelée Longbourn. Ici, nous restons dans les cuisines et l'arrière cour de ces membres de la gentry peu fortunés et c'est l'histoire de Sarah, leur servante et de Mr. et Mrs. Hill, le majordome et la gouvernante qui nous intéresse, celle de leurs maîtres et jeunes maîtresses n'étant évoquée qu'en fonction du travail que leurs vies et leurs aventures impliquent pour leurs domestiques. Ainsi, par exemple, Mr.Darcy n'est évoqué qu'à la fin du roman et les escapades de Jane ou Elizabeth ne le sont qu'en qu'en fonction du travail de nettoyage que leurs vêtements trempés et boueux occasionnent.
Les lecteurs ayant en tête l'intrigue de "Pride and Prejudice" peuvent donc la suivre en filigrane, d'un point de vue tout à fait nouveau. Jo Baker nous révèle ainsi ce qui était resté dans l'ombre, ce qui permet à cette famille, les Bennet, de fonctionner, à leurs repas d'être servis et leur maison chauffée.
Les lecteurs qui ne connaissent pas l'oeuvre de Jane Austen, s'intéresseront plus directement aux personnages imaginés par Jo Baker.
Mais que l'on soit dans un cas ou dans l'autre, c'est surtout l'histoire de Sarah qui nous captive.
Lire la suite ›
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: Broché
Pour ceux qui n'en auraient pas encore entendu parler, c'est l'histoire d'Orgueil et Préjugés "downstairs". C'est à dire que c'est la vie des domestiques de Longbourn au moment du déroulement des évènements du livre.

Je l'ai donc lu en anglais et je dois dire que j'ai avancé doucement parce que le vocabulaire et l'écriture sont très riches. On est bien loin de certaines austeneries de base que je peux lire en une après-midi, en anglais ou pas, et c'est une bonne chose. Ici, l'auteur a une belle plume et sans conteste une éducation et une culture solide. Même si cela ralentit ma lecture en anglais, c'est vraiment un point positif et assez rare qu'il faut souligner.

Nous plongeons donc dans la vie de Sarah, et là encore, nul doute que Jo Baker s'est particulièrement bien documentée sur la domesticité de l'époque. Nous entrons dans tous les détails des tâches qui font la journée de cette jeune fille, parfois même un peu trop je dois dire. Je pense que le livre n'aurait pas souffert de moins de réalisme si l'on nous avait épargné le contenu des pots de chambre!

Ce qui est particulièrement intéressant dans cette approche, c'est que l'on découvre les personnages que l'on pensait si bien connaître sous un angle tout différent. On a de la peine pour Mary, et même un peu pour Mr. Collins, et on se rend compte que Lizzy aussi à ses défauts et cela de façon assez amusante. C'est Sarah qui le dit: Miss Elizabeth n'arpenterait pas si facilement toute la campagne à pieds dans la boue si c'était elle qui devait laver ses jupes!
Lire la suite ›
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: Broché
Il est plaisant de se replonger dans l'univers de Jane Austen mais j'y ai trouvé quelques longueurs, notamment quand l'auteur s'écarte davantage de sa "source" pour inventer le passé des personnages ou se projeter dans leur futur, au-delà des mariages qui terminent Pride & Prejudice.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Life is not as easy for Sarah the housemaid as for her mistress. Under the pretext of seeing the backstage, this well-constructed and well-written book will take you to a journey across XVIIIth century england including its darkest sides : you'll meet children in a poorhouse, soldiers exhausted in a Napoleonian war in Spain, a master getting his servant pregnant, a footman who was born a slave...
Did Jane Austen really know her characters ? Now I am going to re-read "Pride and prejudice", just to check whether Mary, Mr. Bennett, and others are compatible with this version !
Anyway, this book provides more real pleasure to be read in itself than as a game of hide-and-seek with the original...
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus