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Mukiwa, a White Boy in Africa Broché – 1996

4.7 étoiles sur 5 3 commentaires client

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EUR 29,80 EUR 27,85
Broché, 1996

Fête des Mères Fête des Mères

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4.7 étoiles sur 5
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Format: Broché Achat vérifié
If you are interested in Rhodesia during white rule and how things evolved there during the 60's and 70's, go and read this book. It is easy to read, yet powerful. It is impossible not to be moved by the life of Peter Godwin, and his feeling of lost homeland and identity. The last chapters about the massacres in Matabeleland in the 1980's are very violent, but depicts his experience when he came back in Zim as a reporter. Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in colonial history and recent African history as well. Well done!
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Par manya le 23 février 2014
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
took me straight back to my "old" life…yes I was there too and the descriptions, the smells, the fears, the joys…were all there. Wasnt too sure about the shooting of Ian Smith…! But thoroughly enjoyed the book and just sad, because it wasn't fiction, this is what happened and the country has been destroyed …not because of the colonialists but because of the rulers after them.
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Format: Relié Achat vérifié
A Good novel, meeting every expectations I had about it. It should give you pleasure to read and discover this too unknowned a period.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 4.4 étoiles sur 5 95 commentaires
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Solidified Godwin as a Favorite Writer of Mine 8 mai 2013
Par BT Invictus - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
The best memoirs not only render a life, but also a unique time and place. I can't think of a memoir that has done this more beautifully than Peter Godwin's Mukiwa, the first installment in his Rhodesia/Zimbabwe trilogy. By now, I've read all three, and this one is not only my favorite within the trilogy, but definitely my new favorite memoir, and quite possibly one of my favorite books. As a work of creative non-fiction, it's deeply personal, yet unsentimental. It's meticulously crafted and literary, yet still honest and raw. It's a kind of bildungsroman, set against the backdrop of a crumbling Rhodesia, yet it's so much more than a coming-of-age story.

Divided into three books, Mukiwa tells the story of Godwin's rather charmed childhood in Rhodesia, his experiences as an adolescent serving faithfully, yet begrudgingly, in the national police force during the war, and his return to Zimbabwe as an adult, as he tries to make sense the choices he's made, the tragedy that has afflicted his family, the dissolution of Rhodesia and the lingering deleterious effects of colonialism.

It's difficult to choose a favorite section, as they each contribute uniquely to the big picture of his life; however, I just can't praise the first section enough. In it, Godwin captures all the poignancy of childhood - any childhood - as well as the magical quality of his own very strange and wonderful life growing up in Africa. In reading this first section, I was reminded of a theme that Sandra Cisneros grapples with in her vignette "Eleven" - this idea that each year of our lives represents a self that doesn't melt into our current self as we go from birthday to birthday, but that, rather, the little eight year old self is still there, hidden away "Russian-doll style" within the nine year old self, which is still lurking inside the ten year old self, and so on, all the way up to our current age. The honesty and tenderness with which Godwin recounts his childhood years resonated quite deeply with the way I saw the world as a child - albeit, a very different world. His writing made me feel as though that former child is still very much a part of my current self. Children are simultaneously naive and perceptive, irreverent and compassionate - like the child who laughs at a drunken homeless man when he falls over in the alley, and then weeps bitterly when she learns he has no family to go home to and no bed to lie down in at night. As though he were some Freudian psychoanalyst, Peter Godwin so expertly draws that child out so that you are suddenly seeing the strange and hilarious characters of his own youth in that deliciously flippant, yet painfully tender, light, so unique to childhood. As he recounted events, I often found myself stifling what I worried was inappropriate laughter, only to find myself in tears on the very next page. And, as dark and tragic as this memoir is, there are a few memorable moments of levity and ironic humor.

It's late, and I feel like this review is descending into cheesy madness really fast, so I think I may stop. It's very difficult to capture in words every feeling I have about this memoir. It's too good!
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Bittersweet memoir of the painful death of Colonial Rhodesia, and the travesty that followed 13 avril 2014
Par Lynn H - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Peter Godwin's book is not as trite as my title. It is a book of sensual childhood memories of wood smoke, African languages, complex relationships, colonial arrogance, and the conflicted feelings of being a white African just before the colony became independent and fought its way to majority rule. This was the forerunner of several decent books by expat Zimbabwean whites. To me, it is the best.

My favorite part of the book was when young Peter's nanny brought him to the Apostolic church.

The most difficult to read was in the second half of the book. He describes some of how he found himself behaving when, as a very young adult, he was conscripted into the brutality of a civil war.

The saddest part is when he narrates the wasted opportunity to create a fairer country. President Robert Mugabe and his cohorts pillaged and destroyed productive farms and livelihoods with their greed, vengeance, and the anti-white racism they obviously felt was fair payback for what they themselves had experienced in the colony. This escalated to the torturing and killing of their political opponents of color as well.

Peter Godwin, by then a lawyer and journalist, found himself cataloging these atrocities, and has become a campaigner in the effort to bring these deeds into the light.

The book is sobering and rich, and perhaps cautionary as well.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A One-of-a-kind and very special book 16 janvier 2015
Par Joe McDaniel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Mukiwa is a one-of-a-kind and very special book. The author's descriptive abilities are exceptional. Having lived in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe for 13 years (1966 to 1980) and having first-hand knowledge of Godwin's material, I was totally enthralled with his narrative and the truthfulness of his account. I cannot recommend this book more highly. I wish there was a 10-star measure. It nudges Ruark's Something of Value and Wilbur Smith's When the Lion Feeds from the top of my list of all-time favorite books about Africa and the African Experience.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Memory lane… 24 mai 2015
Par Gordon Bold - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Mukiwa brought back many memories of Rhodesia, as Peter and I have had a very similar background, except that I am some years older than he. I too was an Umfana umLungu (Mukiwa) a white boy and like Peter I too spent most of my life in boarding school in both Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), back in the days of the Central African Federation (CAF), and then Southern Rhodesia (Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe). Peter's book rekindled many fond memories and some not so fond memories as things changed and we became embroiled in armed struggles. A must read for anybody who has lived in Southern Africa of all persuasions and been through the ‘Wind of Change’, as one is carried away down memory lane covering people, places and events…
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Recent history which I'm sure you have little knowledge and will find interesting. 28 mars 2015
Par jhmccall - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Wow! This is a history of one of the many African nations which were built and developed into prosperous 20th century existence by European immigrants, settlers, sacrificing everything for the dream of owning land. A first hand, eye witness, account of this young boy growing to manhood in in this African nation. It is very interesting, this information about the successes and failures of life struggles in Africa. This story explains how the African nations of today came to such tragic circumstances. I will recommend this book to many of my friends who enjoy recent history. It is well written and moves right along, you'll enjoy it.
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