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My Life and Work par [Ford, Henry]
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My Life and Work Format Kindle


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Format Kindle, 19 décembre 2012
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Longueur : 206 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

Idées clés, par Business Digest

Le service prime sur le profit
Les bénéfices sont indispensables à toute industrie. Cependant, ils doivent être la sanction d'une réussite industrielle et commerciale et non la raison d'être de l'entreprise. Accorder trop d'attention à l'argent fausse la perception de son véritable rôle.
Mieux vaut vendre plus de voitures avec moins de marge
La consommation de masse est la clé de la réussite. On doit réduire les prix au maximum pour se mettre à la portée des acheteurs et produire en grande quantité.
Ni craindre le futur, ni vénérer le passé
Le plus sûr moyen de ne pas réussir est de ne rien essayer. L'échec est, en effet, constructif car il permet de progresser. La concurrence acharnée, elle, est nocive et limite les progrès humains.

Revue de presse

Le service prime sur le profit
Les bénéfices sont indispensables à toute industrie. Cependant, ils doivent être la sanction d'une réussite industrielle et commerciale et non la raison d'être de l'entreprise. Accorder trop d'attention à l'argent fausse la perception de son véritable rôle.
Mieux vaut vendre plus de voitures avec moins de marge
La consommation de masse est la clé de la réussite. On doit réduire les prix au maximum pour se mettre à la portée des acheteurs et produire en grande quantité.
Ni craindre le futur, ni vénérer le passé
Le plus sûr moyen de ne pas réussir est de ne rien essayer. L'échec est, en effet, constructif car il permet de progresser. La concurrence acharnée, elle, est nocive et limite les progrès humains. -- Idées clés, par Business Digest

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 764 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 206 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 1508515263
  • Editeur : Library of Alexandria (29 juillet 2009)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00AHDHGES
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Lecteur d’écran : Pris en charge
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
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  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°570.274 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 4.4 étoiles sur 5 265 commentaires
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A view of business from one of the best at it, and completely at odds as to how businesses are run today. 24 décembre 2015
Par Gary Meerschaert - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I just finished Henry Ford's Autobiography "My Life and Work" and was quite surprised by it. Other that 3 or 4 pages where he wonders about the "Jewish Problem" (which I would skip if I were you), the rest of the book was astounding. If all businesses were run the way he lays out in the book, the world would be a much better place. He stated that he believed that the purpose of a business was to serve the world in the best way possible while providing employment and compensation at a level that would enable a worker the ability to purchase every need he (or she) had. The way he describes the average worker is astounding coming from a "Captain of Industry". He also proposes the proper place for money, finance, lawyers, and managers. I was completely, and happily, blown away by his vision. Too bad as soon as he retired Ford became like every other company and through most of his ideas out of the window.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Interesting for those who like autos, history, business, or memoirs 25 juillet 2012
Par Patrick J. Southam - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
My Life and Work by automotive pioneer Henry Ford is a combination of memoir and philosophical treatise. This book gives us not only Mr. Ford's reminiscences of creating his first automobiles and the Ford Motor Company, it also gives us his thoughts on business, labor, production, finance, ecology, money, railroads, farming, government, war, and humanity. It is a good read for those who are fans of automobiles, history, and (auto)biography. I read this as an e-book on my kindle device.

Ford doesn't spend words describing his childhood, but instead starts his story with a brief description of himself as a farm boy who liked to tinker with machinery. Mechanical aptitude allowed him to move off the family farm and take a job with the Detroit Edison electric company. That job allowed him time to work on horseless carriages. Soon, the Ford Motor Company was birthed.

Amazingly, by sticking with one model, the "T", Ford was able to year after year drop the price, while still making a profit. Chapter X, "How Cheaply Can Things Be Made?" describes his philosophy behind this. It is interesting that in our modern world, while the prices of many products do go down once they become widely adopted, new automobiles do not seem to be in that category any longer. It came as a surprise to me when Ford wrote about producing just enough component parts and having them delivered to the assembly points at the time they were needed. I first heard of this manufacturing idea about twenty or thirty years ago in an article about the Japanese automakers and their "just in time" production philosophy to keep costs down, and how that should be adopted by the American car companies. It is certainly obvious that the Japanese read Ford's book.

While it is pretty well known that Ford did not invent the assembly line for manufacturing, he did put it to large-scale use. His memoir tells quite a bit about early time-and-motion studies, workers doing repetitive jobs, and jobs that people with disabilities were able to do in his factories. Ford's thoughts on these topics are interesting. As I read these, I did have to remind myself not to apply twenty-first century knowledge to early twentieth century practices. As with all human knowledge, we now build upon what we have learned from predecessors, and they just did not know everything that we know now.

Many automakers competed in racing, giving rise to the saying "win on Sunday, sell on Monday". Henry Ford seems to have built high-speed autos reluctantly. This was another surprise.

Here are two quotes that also took me by surprise, coming from a captain of early twentieth century industry: "A country becomes great when, by the wise development of its resources and the skill of its people, property is widely and fairly distributed." "The human race cannot forever exist half-exploiter and half-exploited." Interesting quotes in this election year, and any time.

After reading this memoir, I still do not know enough about the man to decide if I like him or not. I wonder if he and Will Rogers ever met? I do believe Ford was a very interesting man, and this book should be read by anyone in business.
5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 good read, though not the whole story 29 mars 2016
Par Lionheart - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
It's not that anything included in this book is obviously untrue, but that it's so much less than the real story behind the Ford empire's founding. So this is not the book for someone looking for the unvarnished facts. Quite a lot of it reads like propaganda. Or Ford's attempts to answer his critics at the time, who felt that his methods were dehumanizing society (as well as polluting the earth).

Still, I don't say this as a criticism, but to let you know what you're getting with this book. This is Ford's story of how he started out in the world and became a successful businessman. He is presenting himself in his best light, which is excusable, seeing that this is an autobiography. But it's also a kind of guidebook offered to the business world at large, because it contains Ford's economic, political, and social manifestoes. He is trying to advise the world how to improve itself -- reduce waste, increase wealth (for all), eliminate unemployment, and promote social health and harmony, for example.

There's plenty of idealism, which I found surprising. Ford defends his less attractive methods (like the working conditions inside his factories) as being the lower rungs on a ladder which will one day reach to the heavens. The core of his philosophy revolves around doing things smarter, eliminating waste, and preventing graft. Working on these issues will benefit the company in question, which will in turn benefit the workers, which will in turn enrich society as a whole and destroy all the great social ills of his time and ours. It's a reasonable argument.

But as many reviews of this book have failed to indicate objective material, here is what I found: a pattern of racist ideology throughout the work, starting with Ford's fervent belief that "not all men are created equal." He believes some people can do no better than sweep streets or clean toilets, and so should not be promoted past their station. This idea is then extended to whole races -- some are better suited to management positions, for example, than others, though he does advocate the promoting of exceptional individuals. Also, he seems to indicate as an indisputable fact of history pernicious Jewish influence on society -- both in America and abroad. He thinks that it is a matter of their inferior culture tainting superior ones. Which is kind of what Hitler thought, too. He also does not favor women in the workplace.

But if you can get past that, or least consider Ford's failings as distinct from his successes, you will probably find this a fascinating book. I know I did. Intelligent, thoughtful, concise, and well-written. Clear-headed. Wise. And many of Ford's ideas as relevant today as when he first began to form them. .
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Enlightening Henry Ford. 16 mai 2017
Par Eduardo A. Cruz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Amazing story of one of the first great industrialists ever. Henry Ford was a true entrepreneur who understood extremely well the very fundamentals of business and industry.

He expresses his ideas clearly and directly breaking paradigms of the time. It is surprising that still today his basic concepts are not widely accepted by some people.

Worth read.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Good financial, management and business principals. 21 juillet 2014
Par Kindle Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
There is a decent amount of good principals in this book that many businesses today would be better off by applying to their business models, but there are also a number of places where Mr. Ford alludes to a fairy-tale utopian, socialistic society as part of an answer to so-called inequalities, but he also points out that to the man who works hard and with proper intent, reward (profit) is to be expected and oftentimes inevitable. He has a few ideas I totally disagree with, but a wise individual can filter out the "chaff". There are also some amusing sections that tediously list production numbers and figures that some may find boring, but I found amusing. a somewhat long read, but anyone who will work as a manager under me will now need to read portions of this book.
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