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The Nigger Of The "Narcissus" A Tale Of The Forecastle (English Edition) par [Conrad, Joseph]
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Longueur : 100 pages Composition améliorée: Activé Page Flip: Activé
Langue : Anglais

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Présentation de l'éditeur

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Biographie de l'auteur

Joseph Conrad (1857 – 1924) was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language. He was granted British nationality in 1886 but always considered himself a Pole. Though he did not speak English fluently until he was in his twenties (and always with a marked accent), he was a master prose stylist who brought a distinctly non-English sensibility into English literature. He wrote stories and novels, many with a nautical setting, which depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of an impassive, inscrutable universe.

Conrad’s narrative style and anti-heroic characters have influenced many authors, including D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, Graham Greene, William Golding, William S. Burroughs, Gabriel García Márquez, John le Carré. And many films have been adapted from, or inspired by, Conrad’s works.

Writing in the heyday of the British Empire, Conrad drew on his native Poland’s national experiences and on his personal experiences in the French and British merchant navies to create short stories and novels that reflect aspects of a European-dominated world, while profoundly exploring human psychology.

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  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 383 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 100 pages
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  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B004UK3OTK
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x97808414) étoiles sur 5 31 commentaires
13 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98166774) étoiles sur 5 If you think you have a hard life, reading this book will make you feel better. 13 janvier 2012
Par K. Thomas - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I first read this book many years ago and never forgot Conrad's description of a tremendous gale at sea that lasted for a day and a night, and that put the sailors on board a sailing ship through unbelievable terror and hardship. The fact that it is an autobiographical tale (Conrad was a seaman for twenty years) adds great excitement to the telling. I always wanted to pick the book up again, so, last week, I did and was very glad I did. The reading of that event was as gripping as the first time around. Further, I was more able to appreciate the other qualities of Conrad's writing this time round. I will, however, state at the beginning of this review that, for many modern readers, his late nineteenth century style of prose will probably be far too wordy for them. One example of this will suffice to show what I mean. Here it is. `The feverish and shrill babble of Eastern language struggled against the masterful tones of tipsy seamen, who argued against brazen claims and dishonest hopes by profane shouts'. And that's just on the first page! On the other hand, such wordiness, for a patient modern reader, gives, in my humble opinion, great rewards because he will find himself sucked into the world of isolation, desperation, courage, stoicism, and sheer terror that was life on a sailing ship.

For me, the portrayal of the gale that had the two and a half dozen men strapped to the ship as it lolled in tremendous waves for twenty-four hours on its side, is the highlight of the novel. For Conrad, though, I think he meant it to be the tale of a black seaman who came on board, feigned illness to get out of his duties, and then slowly but surely realized that he really was very sick and was facing his imminent death. This character and his dilemma had a profound effect on his shipmates and the novel examines that in detail. Conrad's characterization is masterful and, by book's end, the reader feels he knows the men very well; from cowardly, trouble-making Donkin to the oldest sailor, Singleton, who stood with his knees locked into the wheel for thirty hours as he fought to keep the ship from turning completely over and drowning everyone on board. And any review of this book that omits the fact that Conrad was Polish is remiss because it is astounding to realize that the writer of this wonderful tale is not a native English speaker. He obviously had a brilliant ear for linguistics. Read this example of Donkin's speech, Donkin being an Englishman of the lowest class.
`....Will yer? Are yer a bloomin' kid? ....Tell an' be damned! Tell, if yer can! I've been treated worser'n a dog by your bloomin' back-lickers. They `as set on me, only to turn against me. Who axed me ter `ave a drink of water?' and so the revolting man goes on.

So, despite the unfashionable wordiness of this work (and the oh, so politically incorrect usage of the term in the title), I am filled with admiration for this writer. Will I return to this novel again? You bet I will.
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x981667c8) étoiles sur 5 Ignore the Title 5 mars 2013
Par JE - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Despite the unfortunate title, this novella presents the unity and harmony that is required for an effective ship's crew (or any team for that matter), and how easy one person can substantially disrupt that harmony. Followers of contemporary American politics, and specifically the eternal debates over legitimate benefits and 'freeloaders,' may also find some of the themes quite familiar.

As an added benefit, the storm scene about halfway through contains some of the most sublime prose ever to illustrate the majesty and horror of a ship caught in a typhoon. Conrad paints with words scenes JMW Turner only imagined...
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98166b34) étoiles sur 5 Descriptive writing 3 janvier 2014
Par Michael A. Smith - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
There is a narrative of a storm at sea that is so well written you'll be exhausted when you've finished it. Despite the politically incorrect title it is not a racist novel. It is simply a novel written over one hundred years ago. It's important to read new and old books to find out where we've come from. Otherwise we begin to think we are the most advanced thinkers ever to have existed. (By the way, that is faulty and dangerous thinking).
HASH(0x98166a2c) étoiles sur 5 Trouble in the Woodpile 16 mai 2016
Par Keith Otis Edwards - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Is this a racist novel? I am inclined to believe that it is, but not specifically because of the title.

With the obvious exception of Ayn Rand, whose books are not so much novels as they are polemics, almost all celebrated modern novelists seem to be of the leftist persuasion. From Émile Zola to Leo Tolstoy to Upton Sinclair and Sinclair Lewis; and obviously George Orwell and Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos writing in sympathy with the Republicans of the Spanish Civil War; and just as obviously John Steinbeck's novel about refugees from the Dust Bowl; Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Saul Bellow; Dashiell Hammett was imprisoned for refusing to name communist sympathizers; James Baldwin, Philip Roth — the list could go on for pages, and I'm straining to come up with even a few right-wing authors: Willa Cather wrote a perfectly awful jingoistic novel about the glory and fulfillment of dying in battle for one's fatherland, but now we must stoop to the lower shelves for conservative authors: Robert Heinlein was a libertarian who coined the maxim "An armed society is a polite society"; James T. Farrell denounced those who protested against the war in Vietnam; then there's Tom Clancy, and do you want to go as low as Mickey Spillane?

I mention this because in the books I've read by Joseph Conrad, especially this one, he is not particularly sympathetic to the worker bees, the proletariate. The seamen depicted in this novel are uniformly ignorant, deceitful and greedy. The title character reveals himself to be a malingerer, and he privately confesses that on a previous voyage on another ship, he succeeded in getting paid for the voyage without doing any work. This character, named James Wait, is pointedly portrayed as a native of the West Indies, a culture then noted for its indolence. (In his autobiography the late prime minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, remarked of his tour of Jamaica, "Theirs was a relaxed culture. The people were full of song and dance, spoke eloquently, danced vigorously, and drank copiously. Hard work they had left behind with the whip.") Conrad chooses this character as a sort of avatar for shirking and getting something for nothing. No wonder the crew is atypically attracted to this man of color. They show scant camaraderie to one another; they despise the captain to the brink of mutiny, but they go to great lengths to nurse and feed Jimmy Wait (who has his own secret cache of biscuits). Their one show of bravery is to rescue him from a flooded cabin when the ship begins to founder during a gale.

The ship's command are given smaller roles, but the contrast could not be more obvious. The captain and his subordinates are depicted as fair and tolerant, except for the case of Jimmy Wait, whom they immediately recognize as being a malingerer. They confine him to a cabin, and because they don't plan on paying him, and they refuse his services when he suddenly proclaims himself fit enough to work.

I read novels by Conrad in my youth, because I enjoyed the harrowing tales of adventure on the high seas, but I did not grasp the social aspect of his work. The real drama of this story is, Who is right? The command or the crew? Is Jimmy Wait shamming his disease or is he genuinely ill? (No spoilers here!)

This novel was written during a surge in populism, simultaneous to when William Jennings Bryan made his celebrated speech, "You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold." But unlike the other celebrated authors named above, Conrad did not conform to the zeitgeist. He would later deal with radicalism (anarchism) in The Secret Agent, but this story is a microcosm — the ship is a petri dish for us to examine. It's obvious that the seamen are incapable of fending for themselves, and after the gale, the captain takes charge and saves the ship. In return, the men show no gratitude. The captain is attacked in a cowardly manner.

What exactly do the men want? Well, what do the populists of today want? Yes, they want more, but the grievance of today, as in Conrad's time, is not so much privation as envy. It wouldn't be so bad that "the people" aren't getting enough, if only Mark Zuckerberg and George Soros had less. That would be justice.

Am I reading too much into this tale of the high seas? Well, don't take my word for it; here is how Conrad ends the novel after one of the crew leaves the ship:
And Donkin, who never did a decent day's work in his life, no doubt earns his living 
by discoursing with filthy eloquence upon the right of labour to live.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98166c18) étoiles sur 5 Not the best of Conrad, but still riveting 30 novembre 2013
Par Jeffrey Carmel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Not the very best of Conrad, but certainly a riveting tale told by one of the masters of English literature and style.
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