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Oedipus at Colonus (Anglais) Broché – 1946

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4,8 étoiles sur 5 9 commentaires provenant des USA

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Softback, ex-library, with usual stamps and markings, in fair all round condition suitable as a reading copy. Translated by Trevelyan, R C.

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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Oedipus at Colonus by Sophocles - A mystical threshold 23 octobre 2014
Par Daniel B. - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Sophocles was 90 years old when he wrote this play. It is a about an old man confronting his own mortality, finishing what remains of his earthly life with courage and then virtually participating directly with the gods in preparing for both death and apotheosis. It is important to be aware of the religious ritual in this play. Sophocles used the technical language of the Mystery religions; his very large audience would immediately sense Sophocles's secular use of religious elements. Or perhaps at his advanced age , so close to death himself, Sophocles was preparing for his death and sharing his objective, blessed, fearless approach with all of us. It's hard not to have such thoughts during a play which grows more serene, quiet, sincere, sacred in its last act. I associate it with Beethoven's mystical late string quartets in its intimacy and intensity. The trappings of drama seem to fall away in those closing moments when the eponymous herald describes Oedipus's disappearance; he has been taken by the gods. It's as if after suffering more grievously than any man at the hands of the gods, at the very end they stretch out those same hands and bring him into their divine community. And we are left here in the world to wonder at the mystery of things, which someday will inevitably be our mystery of departure.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Masterwork 9 juillet 2016
Par Paul G. Peterson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
the greatest testament to the experience of being human at any time and place, it burns as fiercely as ever.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 American Understanding 23 décembre 2012
Par Lisa Woodside - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
This play sometimes puzzles the modern understanding. The version is written to be spoken and easily understood, yet is true to the original. Anyone interested in Greek drama will most likely find this a favorite.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 jebb like no other 26 avril 2015
Par Jack Cade - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
i have studied and translated oedipus turannos( originally just oedipus but renamed after collonus) but read the collonus only in translation--the three plays are NOT a trilogy --how? at what must have been the age of 90 Sophocles could write a masterpiece of this order is a mystery--i have been told be folks much smarter than me that there is hope that more of his plays will be found--couple of things i notice: try to learn the greek the experience of reading him in greek is of a different order translations do not cut it--at least that was my experience with antigone and the Turranos. Jebb for my money was the greatest and remains the greatest scholar of sophocles--i have looked at others and they are no match--i would urge you use him and his wonderful notes--even Jebbs edition for high school students are splendid--now Greek is rarely taught in high schools even in colleges--we sure have come a long way i make no claims at analysis here this is a homage
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Sophocles' final play and the idea suffering is redemptive 19 octobre 2002
Par Lawrance Bernabo - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
In Homer's "Iliad" the one reference to Oedipus suggests he ruled in Thebes until he was killed in battle. However, in the more famous version of the tale, told by Sophocles in his classic Greek tragedy "Oedipus the King," Oedipus blinds himself and leaves Thebes. In "Oedipus at Colonus" Sophocles tells of the final fate of the exiled figure. Colonus is a village outside Athens, where the blind, old man has become a benevolent source of defense to the land that has given him his final refuge.
"Oedipus at Colonus was produced posthumously in 401 B.C.E., and the legend is that it was used by Sophocles as his defense against the charge of senility brought by his children. In terms of its lack of dramatic structure (the scenes are connected by the character of Oedipus rather than by the loosely constructed plot) and the melancholy of its lyric odes it is the most atypical of the extant plays of Sophocles. "Oedipus at Colonus" is the most poetic of his plays while being the least dramatic as well. But it is the characterization of Oedipus as a noble figure that stands out. This is still the same proud and hot-tempered figure who vowed to solve the reason for the curse on Thebes in the earlier play. But this is also an Oedipus who has accepted his punishment, even though he insists that he is innocent. After all, the sin responsible for his exile was really that of his mother; if you read "Oedipus the King" carefully you will see that the incestuous part of the prophecy was added by the Oracle after Jocasta tried to have her infant son killed in order to save her husband's life. Consequently, when Oedipus claims to be a helpless victim of destiny, there is ample reason to agree with his interpretation of events.
The fact that this was the last play written by Sophocles offers a line of analysis for understanding "Oedipus at Colonus" as well. You can read in certain lyrics, such as the first "staismon" with its ode to Colonus and the characterization of King Theseus of Athens, the playwright's praise for the democratic institutions and proud history of Athens. On a more psychological level you can consider the play as articulating Sophocles' views on death. These other considerations tend to reduce the importance of the title character, but there is the compelling argument of the play that through his personal suffering Oedipus has been purified.
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