Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 16,55

Économisez
EUR 6,29 (28%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Control par [King, Stephen A.]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Control Format Kindle


Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 16,55

Longueur : 277 pages Word Wise: Activé Langue : Anglais

Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Who changed Bob Marley's famous peace-and-love anthem into "Come to Jamaica and feel all right"?

When did the Rastafarian fighting white colonial power become the smiling Rastaman spreading beach towels for American tourists?

Drawing on research in social movement theory and protest music, Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Control traces the history and rise of reggae and the story of how an island nation commandeered the music to fashion an image and entice tourists.

Visitors to Jamaica are often unaware that reggae was a revolutionary music rooted in the suffering of Jamaica's poor. Rastafarians were once a target of police harassment and public condemnation. Now the music is a marketing tool, and the Rastafarians are no longer a "violent counterculture" but an important symbol of Jamaica's new cultural heritage.

This book attempts to explain how the Jamaican establishment's strategies of social control influenced the evolutionary direction of both the music and the Rastafarian movement.

From 1959 to 1971, Jamaica's popular music became identified with the Rastafarians, a social movement that gave voice to the country's poor black communities. In response to this challenge, the Jamaican government banned politically controversial reggae songs from the airwaves and jailed or deported Rastafarian leaders.

Yet when reggae became internationally popular in the 1970s, divisions among Rastafarians grew wider, spawning a number of pseudo-Rastafarians who embraced only the external symbolism of this worldwide religion. Exploiting this opportunity, Jamaica's new Prime Minister, Michael Manley, brought Rastafarian political imagery and themes into the mainstream. Eventually, reggae and Rastafari evolved into Jamaica's chief cultural commodities and tourist attractions.

Stephen A. King is associate professor of speech communication at Delta State University. His work has been published in the Howard Journal of Communications, Popular Music and Society, and The Journal of Popular Culture.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2070 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 176 pages
  • Editeur : University Press of Mississippi (15 novembre 2002)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B001M0O39G
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Non activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : Soyez la première personne à écrire un commentaire sur cet article
  •  Voulez-vous faire un commentaire sur des images ou nous signaler un prix inférieur ?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoile

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8d767bf4) étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8d4e596c) étoiles sur 5 Fresh analysis of a misunderstood movement 22 novembre 2005
Par D. Brown - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
King's work reads a lot like a dissertation with its use of MLA format and cititations. However, that does not diminish the importance of the focus of his work: how Rastafarianism, once a politicaly charge culture, was co-opted by Jamaica and morphed into a tourist friendly cariracture. King's writing becomes a bit repetitive at times (in his analysis of The Gleaner) something the editors should have noticed. A pivatol study for those who are investigating reggae in academic circles despite the high price.
Ce commentaire a-t-il été utile ? Dites-le-nous