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Secret Identity: The Fetish Art of Superman's Co-Creator Joe Shuster (Anglais) Relié – 1 avril 2009

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4,4 étoiles sur 5 27 Commentaires sur Amazon.com |

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

"Secret Identity: The Fetish Art of Superman's Co-creator Joe Shuster" showcases rare and recently discovered early erotic artwork by the most seminal artist in comics. Created in the late 1940s when Shuster was down on his luck after suing "DC Comics" over the copyright for "Superman", he illustrated these images for an obscure series of magazines called "Nights of Terror", published under the counter until it was banned by the U.S. Senate. The discovery of this artwork reveals the 'secret identity' of this revered comics creator and is sure to generate controversy and change the perception of the way we look at Clark Kent, Lois Lane, Lana Lang and Jimmy Olsen forever. The book includes reproductions of these images and an introduction that provides a detailed account of the scandal and the court trial that resulted from the publication of this racy material.

Biographie de l'auteur

Craig Yoe runs the New York design firm YOE! Studio with Clizia Gussoni. Yoe is the author of over thirty books, including The Art of Mickey Mouse, which was a Time magazine book of the year and boasted an introduction by John Updike. Yoe has won the Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators, two Addys, the Mobius, and an Eisner Award. Yoe is a popular speaker and has curated art exhibits around the world. Joseph "Joe" Shuster (1914-1992) was a Jewish, Canadian-born comic book artist. He later moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and is best known for co-creating Superman, with boyhood pal and writer Jerry Siegel. Published by DC Comics in Action Comics no. 1 (June 1938), Superman lays the groundwork for the entire comic book industry.

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Détails sur le produit

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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.4 étoiles sur 5 27 commentaires
60 internautes sur 62 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Finally, the missing piece of the puzzle! 11 mars 2009
Par David Burd - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Anyone even remotely interested in comics has heard the story of Superman's creation many times over. Two imaginative kids from Cleveland concoct this fantastic tale of super-heroics and an industry is born. Likewise, we've all heard the story of how Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster lost control of their character in a bitter lawsuit with DC Comics in the late 1940's. The same is true of the last chapter: With a big-budget Superman movie in the works, pressure is put upon DC by the community of comic artists. Siegel and Shuster are given a pension by DC and their credits are restored to the comic pages. But the Christopher Reeve Superman movie was released in 1978 and the DC lawsuit took place in 1948. That's a gap of nearly three decades in which Shuster is unaccounted for! An anecdote about Joe working as a messenger is the only story we've heard that explains what Shuster did in those missing years.

Now, with this book, Craig Yoe fills in the missing chapter in the Joe Shuster story. With an introduction by no less than Stan Lee, it is by turns sad, sordid, strange, shocking and super-man-datory reading. Without giving any of it away (I want you to be as fascinated as I was) the story of Joe's lost years involves obscenity, torture, murder and a cast of characters as odd and as varied as the ones he drew in the comic books. Fredric Wertham makes an appearance, along with various gangsters and pornographers, the US Supreme Court, and even Hitler!

No less startling is the art that Shuster produced during this period. It's a tossup as to which is more disturbing, Joe's fetish art or the true story behind it. Subject matter aside, Shuster did some of the best work of his career in this gap between Superman, the comic book and Superman, the movie. Yet it's almost impossible to appreciate the drawing without an uneasy feeling about the bizarre scenes he depicts and the sleazy underworld for which it was created.

Although on the surface this is an art book (the first title released by the new Abrahms ComicArts imprint) it is as much an exposé and a serious work of history. Yoe and his investigators did an amazing job of researching the scandalous facts surrounding these undiscovered drawings and putting them in the proper context.

Joe Shuster's secret identity is revealed at last.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A sad story about a shameful time in our history with kinky pictures to boot! 3 octobre 2012
Par tsktsktsk - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I didn't know what to expect when I got this book. I had heard before about how DC had screwed Siegel and Schuster out of their creation but I never knew that Joe Schuster did fetish art for pulps to survive after that! I'm no prude but seeing some very familiar characters or close likenesses appearing in S&M situations was a little weird.

It was sad seeing how far the government went to suppress these pulps as well as horror magazines and anything deemed to be offensive and leading to the corruption of the youth. Even though these books weren't marketed to or sold to kids, and they had a very small distribution they were still banned and burned by the government. They even blamed the pulps for some murders committed by young people, which sadly isn't the first or last time that will happen.

If you like comic book art and appreciate the historic value (and even the kinkiness) of the drawings I would get this.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 My parents were right, sort of! 23 septembre 2010
Par Wandering boy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
As a youngster, my parents said the people that wrote and illustrated "funny books", as they called them, were probably not nice people, were probably run by the mob and would never enter the "real world" of books.

Well, they got part of that right, but missed the boat totally on other parts.

This is a fascinating and revealing portrait of one of comics most well known illustrators from the golden years of comics.

It is also sad to see the eventual outcome of a person like Joe Shuster that had so much incredible talent and, I believe, ability to read into the future of where comic book illustrators were going to fall in acceptablity and respect.

Fascinating, sad very interesting story.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Finally, the missing piece of the puzzle! 13 avril 2009
Par David Burd - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
Anyone even remotely interested in comics has heard the story of Superman's creation many times over. Two imaginative kids from Cleveland concoct this fantastic tale of super-heroics and an industry is born. Likewise, we've all heard the story of how Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster lost control of their character in a bitter lawsuit with DC Comics in the late 1940's. The same is true of the last chapter: With a big-budget Superman movie in the works, pressure is put upon DC by the community of comic artists. Siegel and Shuster are given a pension by DC and their credits are restored to the comic pages. But the Christopher Reeve Superman movie was released in 1978 and the DC lawsuit took place in 1948. That's a gap of nearly three decades in which Shuster is unaccounted for! An anecdote about Joe working as a messenger is the only story we've heard that explains what Shuster did in those missing years.

Now, with this book, Craig Yoe fills in the missing chapter in the Joe Shuster story. With an introduction by no less than Stan Lee, it is by turns sad, sordid, strange, shocking and super-man-datory reading. Without giving any of it away (I want you to be as fascinated as I was) the story of Joe's lost years involves obscenity, torture, murder and a cast of characters as odd and as varied as the ones he drew in the comic books. Fredric Wertham makes an appearance, along with various gangsters and pornographers, the US Supreme Court, and even Hitler!

No less startling is the art that Shuster produced during this period. It's a tossup as to which is more disturbing, Joe's fetish art or the true story behind it. Subject matter aside, Shuster did some of the best work of his career in this gap between Superman, the comic book and Superman, the movie. Yet it's almost impossible to appreciate the drawing without an uneasy feeling about the bizarre scenes he depicts and the sleazy underworld for which it was created.

Although on the surface this is an art book (the first title released by the new Abrahms ComicArts imprint) it is as much an exposé and a serious work of history. Yoe and his investigators did an amazing job of researching the scandalous facts surrounding these undiscovered drawings and putting them in the proper context.

Joe Shuster's secret identity is revealed at last.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Historical, factual and interesting. 29 janvier 2014
Par Lorcan Dragonskull - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
If you love comic books, and would like to know about the early history of comics this is the book for you!
It's the story of the artist that created and drew Superman, Joe Shuster, and how he was forced to resort to 'fetish art' to survive after losing a courtroom battle over artist's rights with his former employer.
This is also how the world of comic books was assailed by 'do-gooders' trying to convince the populace that they were bad for youth.
A similar situation to the Hollywood Blacklist, that ruined writers and actors' careers, who were labeled as 'communists'.
A story that's both compelling and true, that allows the reader to get a perspective of a forgotten historic era.
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