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The Life and Most Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner (1801) (English Edition) par [Defoe, Daniel]
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The Life and Most Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner (1801) (English Edition) Format Kindle


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Longueur : 126 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
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I was born in the Year 1632, in the City of York, of a good Family, tho not of that Country, my Father being a Foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull: He got a good Estate by Merchandise, and leaving off his Trade, lived afterward at York, from whence he had married my Mother, whose Relations were named Robinson, a very good Family in that Country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual Corruption of Words in England, we are now called, nay we call our selves, and write our Name Crusoe, and so my Companions always call’d me.

I had two elder Brothers, one of which was Lieutenant Collonel to an English Regiment of Foot in Flanders, formerly commanded by the famous Coll. Lockhart, and was killed at the Battle near Dunkirk against the Spaniards: What became of my second Brother I never knew any more than my Father or Mother did know what was become of me.

Being the third Son of the Family, and not bred to any Trade, my Head began to be fill’d very early with rambling Thoughts: My Father, who was very ancient, had given me a competent Share of Learning, as far as House-Education, and a Country Free-School generally goes, and design’d me for the Law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but going to Sea, and my Inclination to this led me so strongly against the Will, nay the Commands of my Father, and against all the Entreaties and Perswasions of my Mother and other Friends, that there seem’d to be something fatal in that Propension of Nature tending directly to the Life of Misery which was to be-fal me.

My Father, a wise and grave Man, gave me serious and excellent Counsel against what he foresaw was my Design. He call’d me one Morning into his Chamber, where he was confined by the Gout, and expostulated very warmly with me upon this Subject: He ask’d me what Reasons more than a meer wandring Inclination I had for leaving my Father’s House and my native Country, where I might be well introduced, and had a Prospect of raising my Fortunes by Application and Industry, with a Life of Ease and Pleasure. He told me it was for Men of desperate Fortunes on one Hand, or of aspiring, superior Fortunes on the other, who went abroad upon Adventures, to rise by Enterprize, and make themselves famous in Undertakings of a Nature out of the common Road; that these things were all either too far above me, or too far below me; that mine was the middle State, or what might be called the upper Station of Low Life, which he had found by long Experience was the best State in the World, the most suited to human Happiness, not exposed to the Miseries and Hardships, the Labour and Sufferings of the mechanick Part of Mankind, and not embarass’d with the Pride, Luxury, Ambition and Envy of the upper Part of Mankind. He told me, I might judge of the Happiness of this State, by this one thing, viz. That this was the State of Life which all other People envied, that Kings have frequently lamented the miserable Consequences of being born to great things, and wish’d they had been placed in the Middle of the two Extremes, between the Mean and the Great; that the wise Man gave his Testimony to this as the just Standard of true Felicity, when he prayed to have neither Poverty or Riches.

He bid me observe it, and I should always find, that the Calamities of Life were shared among the upper and lower Part of Mankind; but that the middle Station had the fewest Disasters, and was not expos’d to so many Vicissitudes as the higher or lower Part of Mankind; nay, they were not subjected to so many Distempers and Uneasinesses either of Body or Mind, as those were who, by vi-cious Living, Luxury and Extravagancies on one Hand, or by hard Labour, Want of Necessaries, and mean or insufficient Diet on the other Hand, bring Distempers upon themselves by the natural Consequences of their Way of Living; That the middle Station of Life was calculated for all kind of Vertues and all kinds of Enjoyments; that Peace and Plenty were the Hand-maids of a middle Fortune; that Temperance, Moderation, Quietness, Health, Society, all agreeable Diversions, and all desirable Pleasures, were the Blessings attending the middle Station of Life; that this Way Men went silently and smoothly thro’ the World, and comfortably out of it, not embarass’d with the Labours of the Hands or of the Head, not sold to the Life of Slavery for daily Bread, or harrast with perplex’d Circumstances, which rob the Soul of Peace, and the Body of Rest; not enrag’d with the Passion of Envy, or secret burning Lust of Ambition for great things; but in easy Circumstances sliding gently thro the World, and sensibly tasting the Sweets of living, without the bitter, feeling that they are happy, and learning by every Day’s Experience to know it more sensibly.

After this, he press’d me earnestly, and in the most affectionate manner, not to play the young Man, not to precipitate my self into Miseries which Nature and the Station of Life I was born in, seem’d to have provided against; that I was under no Necessity of seeking my Bread; that he would do well for me, and endeavour to enter me fairly into the Station of Life which he had been just recommending to me; and that if I was not very easy and happy in the World, it must be my meer Fate or Fault that must hinder it, and that he should have nothing to answer for, having thus discharg’d his Duty in warning me against Measures which he knew would be to my Hurt: In a word, that as he would do very kind things for me if I would stay and settle at Home as he directed, so he would not have so much Hand in my Misfortunes, as to give me any Encouragement to go away: And to close all, he told me I had my elder Brother for an Example, to whom he had used the same earnest Perswasions to keep him from going into the Low Country Wars, but could not prevail, his young Desires prompting him to run into the Army where he was kill’d; and tho’ he said he would not cease to pray for me, yet he would venture to say to me, that if I did take this foolish Step, God would not bless me, and I would have Leisure hereafter to reflect upon having neglected his Counsel when there might be none to assist in my Recovery.

I observed in this last Part of his Discourse, which was truly Prophetick, tho’ I suppose my Father did not know it to be so himself; I say, I observed the Tears run down his Face very plentifully, and especially when he spoke of my Brother who was kill’d; and that when he spoke of my having Leisure to repent, and none to assist me, he was so mov’d, that he broke off the Discourse, and told me, his Heart was so full he could say no more to me.

I was sincerely affected with this Discourse, as indeed who could be otherwise; and I resolv’d not to think of going abroad any more, but to settle at home according to my Father’s Desire. But alas! a few Days wore it all off; and in short, to prevent any of my Father’s farther Importunities, in a few Weeks after, I resolv’d to run quite away from him. However, I did not act so hastily neither as my first Heat of Resolution prompted, but I took my Mother, at a time when I thought her a little pleasanter than ordinary, and told her, that my Thoughts were so entirely bent upon seeing the World, that I should never settle to any thing with Resolution enough to go through with it, and my Father had better give me his Consent than force me to go without it; that I was now Eighteen Years old, which was too late to go Apprentice to a Trade, or Clerk to an Attorney; that I was sure if I did, I should never serve out my time, and I should certainly run away from my Master before my Time was out, and go to Sea; and if she would speak to my Father to let me go but one Voyage abroad, if I came home again and did not like it, I would go no more, and I would promise by a double Diligence to recover that Time I had lost.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up-Defoe's classic novel of shipwreck and survival, now nearly 300 years old, is abridged competently in this recording. The flavor of the 18th century language is retained, but the plot moves along at a pace more appealing to 21st century ears. The reader, Martin Shaw, has a pleasant voice, but unfortunately tends to trail off at the ends of sentences, losing whole words. As with all abridgements, large sections of the story and entire characters are omitted, but since most of the book tells of Crusoe's solitary sojourn on the island, this is not a major problem. This version is no substitute for the original, but it would be a supplemental purchase in libraries where abridgements are popular.
Sarah Flowers, Santa Clara County Library, Morgan Hill, CA
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 784 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 126 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Illimité
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00848OHIQ
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x924eec54) étoiles sur 5 24 commentaires
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x925ed858) étoiles sur 5 One of my Favourite Books 27 juillet 2012
Par J. Yasmineh - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
The Story of Robinson Crusoe may be the first independent novel ever written, and for that invention alone we have Daniel Defoe to thank. Inspired by the account of the castaway Alexander Selkirk (of which this edition includes appended) it nevertheless deviates completely from Selkirk's account to tell a moralistic story of high adventure.

The story begins with Crusoe at 19, coming from a well-to-do family with an education and prospects, who nevertheless shuns his fortune to risk his life at sea. His subsequent misfortunes are carefully designed by Defoe to both educate Crusoe in those skills necessary for a life of abject solitude, and to variously spare him and deliver him into the fortunate circumstance where he can learn particular moral lessons.

The moral lesson that Defoe is most interested in conveying (sometimes ad nauseum) is that Protestant interpretation of Christianity which promotes the beneficial relationship with God, whereby His divine providence clearly rewards those who sufficiently attend to their worship, are sufficiently thankful in their contemplations and content with the gifts and opportunities with which they have been provided. Those who do not, are adequately punished.

As such, it reads like the Old Testament Book of Job. The story runs as if the entire world is set up expressly to teach Robinson Crusoe particular lessons. This would be fine, if not for the fact that countless other innocent souls are incidentally condemned to death just to set up Crusoe for redemption. Even accounting for the fact that God should be able to manipulate all the threads of life in the Universe to a just end, it really does appear in the book that several of those who come to the "period" of their lives seem quite innocent of any sufficient iniquity to justify the loss of their existence, merely to contribute to Crusoe's theological betterment.

As such, the story is distinct from Selkirk's in that where Selkirk had a rough time of it on an almost uninhabitable island, Crusoe met with every bit of good fortune possible, with abundant space, fertility, food, water and animal life, and any tribulations he encountered were invariably of his own making or due to his own shortcomings.

Despite all this, and despite that fully half the book feels like it is given over to sermonising, the story remains absolutely fascinating. In spite of the almost literal deus ex machina that Defoe continuously employs to move the story along according to his design, despite the sometimes fantastic luck that Crusoe undeservedly gets, and the dramatic exaggerations Defoe sometimes employs concerning his hero and the forces arrayed against him, it's still a captivating (if you'll pardon the reference) castaway story that has me hooked every time I read it.

Even the endless sermonising, the assumed cultural superiority, the casual acceptance of slavery and the often disgusting racism didn't phase me. The book is merely a product of its times (and for all that is reasonably progressive given that context) and in any case, serves to illustrate the unenlightened, negative attitudes and assumptions of the people who lived in the 18th Century. On the positive side, it does reflect the progressive attitude of the reformation versus the primitive superiority of the Catholics of those times, comparing the terrible way in which the Spanish used (and destroyed) the natives of America, with Defoe's own ideas on how those 'less blessed' should be treated (forcibly converted and enslaved, apparently, though he eschews wanton cruelty).

I love this book, both as a landmark in human story telling and in being a moral stepping-stone on the way to modern ethical (and even economic) discourse. The aged language is a pleasure to read. The shame of it is that so many present-day Christians have regressed in their attitudes to the point where their prejudices would bring a blush to the cheeks of even the semi-enlightened Defoe.

This Kindle edition is perfectly acceptable, though it is unfortunate that several pages are missing (I can but hope this will be rectified at some point in the future) but for a rock-bottom price of nothing dollars, we can't complain too much. Further, there are a few OCR-related mistakes on occasion, over and above those differences between Defoe's spelling and modern English, but neither of these harm the reading experience. I cannot recommend it enough.
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x925edaa4) étoiles sur 5 Enjoying it it again 24 avril 2014
Par Pauline - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Am reading it again at age 77. I remember reading it as a teen in the summertime and enjoying it then and again now.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x925eda68) étoiles sur 5 which was good, this original book goes in depth to what ... 6 juillet 2014
Par Clara R. Lewis - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
In spite of the movie, which was good, this original book goes in depth to what happened to Robinson Crusoe. I read it in my teens and now I am 64, so I read it again. I was amazed at what I had forgotten. For instance I thought he was stranded for 20 years, but it was 27. This book is about man's ability to overcome challenges both physical and mental. Forget any Survivor show you have ever seen. This book goes WAY beyond that!
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x925edd5c) étoiles sur 5 Crusoe and the ship's captain strike a deal in which Crusoe helps the captain and the loyal sailors retake the ship and leave th 20 novembre 2014
Par Very Brown Bear - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Crusoe (the family name corrupted from the German name "Kreutznaer") sets sail from the Queen's Dock in Hull on a sea voyage in August 1651, against the wishes of his parents, who want him to pursue a career, possibly in law. After a tumultuous journey where his ship is wrecked in a storm, his lust for the sea remains so strong that he sets out to sea again. This journey, too, ends in disaster as the ship is taken over by Salé pirates (the Salé Rovers) and Crusoe is enslaved by a Moor. Two years later, he escapes in a boat with a boy named Xury; a Captain of a Portuguese ship off the west coast of Africa rescues him. The ship is en route to Brazil. Crusoe sells Xury to the captain. With the captain's help, Crusoe procures a plantation.
Years later, Crusoe joins an expedition to bring slaves from Africa but he is shipwrecked in a storm about forty miles out to sea on an island (which he calls the Island of Despair) near the mouth of the Orinoco river on 30 September 1659. (The date was left blank in the first edition. The years added up after 1651, or, his total of years reckoned backwards from 1686 yield 1658 so the 1659 is an error. The story claims that he swam ashore on his 26th birthday.) The details of Crusoe's island were probably based on the Caribbean island of Tobago, since that island lies a short distance north of the Venezuelan coast near the mouth of the Orinoco river, in sight of Trinidad.[8] He observes the latitude as 9 degrees and 22 minutes north. He sees penguins and seals on his island. (However, there are no seals and penguins living together in the Northern Hemisphere, only around the Galapagos Islands.) As for his arrival there, only he and three animals, the captain's dog and two cats, survive the shipwreck. Overcoming his despair, he fetches arms, tools, and other supplies from the ship before it breaks apart and sinks. He builds a fenced-in habitat near a cave which he excavates. By making marks in a wooden cross, he creates a calendar. By using tools salvaged from the ship, and some he makes himself from "ironwood", he hunts, grows barley and rice, dries grapes to make raisins, learns to make pottery, and raises goats. He also adopts a small parrot. He reads the Bible and becomes religious, thanking God for his fate in which nothing is missing but human society.
More years pass and Crusoe discovers native cannibals, who occasionally visit the island to kill and eat prisoners. At first he plans to kill them for committing an abomination but later realizes he has no right to do so, as the cannibals do not knowingly commit a crime. He dreams of obtaining one or two servants by freeing some prisoners; when a prisoner escapes, Crusoe helps him, naming his new companion "Friday" after the day of the week he appeared. Crusoe then teaches him English and converts him to Christianity. After more natives arrive to partake in a cannibal feast, Crusoe and Friday kill most of the natives and save two prisoners. One is Friday's father and the other is a Spaniard, who informs Crusoe about other Spaniards shipwrecked on the mainland. A plan is devised wherein the Spaniard would return to the mainland with Friday's father and bring back the others, build a ship, and sail to a Spanish port.
Before the Spaniards return, an English ship appears; mutineers have commandeered the vessel and intend to maroon their captain on the island. Crusoe and the ship's captain strike a deal in which Crusoe helps the captain and the loyal sailors retake the ship and leave the worst mutineers on the island. Before embarking for England, Crusoe shows the mutineers how he survived on the island and states that there will be more men coming. Crusoe leaves the island 19 December 1686 and arrives in England on 11 June 1687. He learns that his family believed him dead; as a result, he was left nothing in his father's will. Crusoe departs for Lisbon to reclaim the profits of his estate in Brazil, which has granted him much wealth. In conclusion, he transports his wealth overland to England to avoid travelling by sea. Friday accompanies him and, en route, they endure one last adventure together as they fight off famished wolves while crossing the Pyrenees.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x925eddbc) étoiles sur 5 Adventure 21 avril 2014
Par Dale Kennedy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
this is the greatest adventure book I have ever read. I wish I had read it when I was much younger. It is truly a classic.
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