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Les Symphonies / Ouvertures


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Page Artiste Claudio Abbado


Détails sur le produit

  • Interprète: Claudio Abbado, Multi-Artistes
  • Orchestre: Wiener Philharmoniker
  • Chef d'orchestre: Claudio Abbado
  • Compositeur: Ludwig Beethoven
  • CD (20 février 1989)
  • Nombre de disques: 6
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN : B00000E4D9
  • Autres versions : Téléchargement MP3
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Descriptions du produit

ABBADO CLAUDIO / WIENER P. O.

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Amazon.com: HASH(0x9b18378c) étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires
29 internautes sur 29 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9db6c270) étoiles sur 5 Superb Viennese Beethoven 4 décembre 2003
Par T. Beers - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
This is Claudio Abbado's first Beethoven symphony cycle, and it has come in for some astonishingly negative criticism over the years. Most of that criticism seems judge the cycle a failure because it doesn't offer new insights into what Beethoven's symphonies are about. But I can't agree, probably because I don't subscribe to a "progressive" critical ideology that insists on novelty as a prerequisite for artistic performance (& recording). And maybe even Abbado has come around to that kind of ideologized thinking: his second cycle (also on DGG, but with the Berlin Philharmonic) is based on the new Jonathan Del Mar (Barenreiter) edition of the scores and reflects Beethoven performance style(s) pioneered by the likes of Roger Norrington, Nikolaus Harnoncourt and others. I don't have anything against fresh thinking when it comes to performing Beethoven, nor do I worship at the altar of tradition. In fact, I'm delighted by Harnoncourt's recordings, and think that Simon Rattle's EMI set, which also uses the Del Mar/Barenreiter scores, has been woefully under-appreciated.

But there's always going to be room for traditionalist (old scores, big orchestras, modern instruments) performances of Beethoven, particularly when they are executed as cogently and convincingly as they are in Abbado's Vienna Philharmonic cycle. Clearly, this cycle, digitally recorded in the mid-1980s, owes just about everything to what we have come to think of as mainstream, Central European music-making: orchestral sound is full and warm, tempi are urgent but often broad, phrasing and voicing reflect a Viennese performance "grammar" developed over a 100 year period by conductors like Mahler and Weingartner and Krauss and Furtwaengler and Karajan and Boehm. Just to mention those names indicates a wide variety of expressive variation within the core grammar, but still, variations within a coherently identifiable tradition. That tradition may now have come to an end: in a DVD included with Rattle's Vienna set, Sir Simon says the orchestra came to him for something new after realizing that all of the old maestros had passed on and taken the tradition with them.

If this is true, Abbado's DGG Vienna Beethoven cycle may represent the last chapter of the old style. And if so, we are lucky that the tradition ended in Abbado's capable hands and was so beautifully captured by DGG's engineering team. (Note: these digital recordings establish once and for all, to my mind, that digital sound need not be harsh and flat and kleig-lit; sound quality here is beautifully rich and full.) Final word of a long review: if you're not put off by what we now need to call "middle of the road" Beethoven, and you're looking for a first-rate example of the incomparable Vienna Beethoven tradition, you can't do better than this set.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9db6ce88) étoiles sur 5 The Best Overall Beethoven Symphonies Set I've Heard 16 août 2011
Par David Phipps - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
This set of Beethoven symphonies is, to me, quite simply, the best overall set I have ever heard. Just so you know, I have heard Abbado's later set with Berlin, both Bernstein sets, (the 60's set with the NY Phil and the set with Vienna on DG), both Solti sets with the Chicago Symphony, all three Karajan sets, Karl Böhm and Vienna, Steinberg and Pittsburg, Szell-Cleveland, and even the sacred cow set with Toscanini. (I also have the Kleiber-Vienna 5th and 7th.) Abbado-Vienna outdoes them all, to my ears.

First of all, the recording perspective is perfect. Vienna's concert hall is world-renowned enough as to need no comment, so I won't waste time on it. DG's placement within that hall is quite realistic, seeming to be not quite halfway back. The stereo separation has plenty of breadth to it, but neither do you have the sensation of being dropped right on top of the orchestra like you do with Karajan's DDD set or with Solti's 70's set, for example.

If I have any caveats about this set, it would only be the recording volume. But it's not really a caveat, as you'll see. The volume, to me, seemed to be just a notch too low, but this was easily corrected by simply turning up the volume a bit. The good thing about this, however, is that, once corrected, it allows the dynamic range a highly effective expansiveness, so that the pianissimos and fortissimos really have a dramatic impact with each other. So with the volume up just a bit and the perspective of the recording, the sound on this recording is quite excellent.

All I'll say about the orchestra is two things, the first being that Vienna is the world's pre-eminent Beethoven orchestra. (Vienna was Beethoven's adopted home, after all.) Under the right baton, nobody knows how to play Beethoven like Vienna. (Sorry, Berlin, but it's true.) And they respond magnificently to Abbado's baton, giving him performances that are every bit as intense, in a Beethoven way, as their Mahler recordings with Bernstein. I can easily see them collapsing with happy exhaustion at the end of these recordings. Their performances throughout the set are flawless.

Then there's Abbado, and, even after the praises I've already mentioned, he is the big difference maker in the end. Abbado is what elevates this set above all the others I mentioned at the beginning of this review. Abbado seems to bring an operatic sense of lyricism and drama to overlay with Vienna's Beethoven tradition.

What this means is that, rather than simply ticking successive movements off the list like so many sets seem to do ("Whew, got that one done, now we can get to this next one that we actually wanted to do!"), Abbado and Vienna, instead, give me the distinct sense of experiencing this music for the very first time, like I've never heard it before. Abbado is continuously, unswervingly careful to balance the orchestra so that the melodic line and important interweaving parts are constantly audible, never being buried under an avalanche of sound. (This is a problem throughout Karajan's performances.) There's always something going on, something that NEEDS to be heard being brought to your attention by Abbado. You are never allowed a "boring" moment to go do something else while you wait for the next "good" part.

Those melodic lines and interweaving parts aren't just notes being dutifully played either, which is often the case on most Beethoven recordings, sadly enough. In this set, those parts are a song - a song that is being so thoroughly developed by a master composer that, when Beethoven's done with it, there is nothing left to be said. But Abbado/Vienna make sure that we hear every "word" of that "song", with feeling and with unmistakable clarity, so that we don't miss anything.

While staying faithfully within the "dynamic" markings in Beethoven's scores (dynamic markings are, essentially, the composer's loudness/softness instructions), these performances have a constant, breathing life to them, swelling here, ebbing there, giving the listener a sense of inexorable "direction" to the proceedings, like the music has something to say and it is unswervingly driving toward the point. Abbado-Vienna always have something to say, never lapsing into "cruise control" mode.

Too often, just to cite one example, the first movement of the Ninth Symphony seems to plod along, sleepily trudging through the pianissimo (soft) passages while we sigh with impatience for the next loud passage to come along so we can wake up the audience again. Huh. Not on this recording. On this recording, the pianissimo passages have a relentless air of nervous, taut suspense, almost as if, in fact, you DON'T want that loud passage to arrive. That loud passage might be just too much to take. Throughout this entire Ninth Symphony, I could easily envision myself at the first-ever performance in 1825 (in Vienna, happily enough) on the edge of my seat, watching a movie that was so intense that I was praying it would hurry up and end, and yet also hoping it would never end, which I imagine might have been how some of the first audiences responded, after a lifetime of such relative salon music as most composers were writing in those times, compared to this dramatic epic. I have never experienced anything like that with any other Beethoven Ninth recording, of having the sense of hearing the music as though it was brand new. That freshness is consistent throughout all nine symphonies as well in the Abbado-Vienna set.

There is one final thing that I'll mention that is a strong selling point for this set, all other points aside. Abbado takes every single repeat everywhere in all nine symphonies. There is no repeat anywhere that he ever skips. The only other sets I'm aware of that do this is Solti's first set with the Chicago Symphony and Abbado's other set, with Berlin. (Solti's second set skips some of the repeats.) Abbado even takes the exposition repeat in the Eroica, and what's more, the extremely rare repeat in the Ninth Symphony Scherzo's second section, just before the trio. They're all there.

Speaking of Abbado's other set with Berlin, as I mentioned earlier, I have heard it, and it is certainly quite good. It uses a smaller-scale orchestra and considerably quicker tempi (speeds), admittedly, probably closer to what would have been the case in Beethoven's time. My personal preference, however, is for the big-orchestra, "romantic" approach, and that is precisely what Abbado's Vienna set delivers, par excellence. (For those of you who prefer the quicker, lighter-texture approach, I have no problem with that approach whatsoever, it's purely a preference of mine, so please allow me my preference just as I will happily allow you yours.)

So, to sum it up, I might buy the occasional individual Beethoven symphony here and there just to see how so-and-so conductor and orchestra fare with it, but my days of buying complete sets of the nine symphonies are over. After this set, it would be a waste of time and money.

This set gets five stars, but only because I can't give it six.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9db6c540) étoiles sur 5 Cometh the Man, Cometh the Niceness 5 juillet 2015
Par Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Nietzsche tells us to become what we are. Much to the anguish of some, there are limits to this maxim. Nevertheless, it resonates.

Take for instance those mother-fornicators at Goldman Sachs. Much like ISIS, it incarnates evil – and not merely from the absence of light. Lloyd Blankfein – a velociraptor in a suit – has tried repeatedly to join the Australian Knappertsbusch Association; on every occasion, I’ve told him to go forth and multiply in earthy terms. Even so, my respect for Lloyd and his evil, vampiric Empire would skyrocket if they ditched all that phoney “we bought a couple of badminton racquets for the handicapped kids” and started funnelling nukes directly to Iran at a 90% mark-up – and thereafter, Lloyd hits the town triumphantly in a Mercedes Benz 540K (circa 1937) with bimbos and booze in train. As Mister Bigglesworth would say, there’s no point being the margarine of evil. Be what you are to the max!

Along these lines, I’m starting to wonder if I’ve been too hard on Uncle Claudio. He was a nice guy. Niceness became him. His sheet – and indeed, sheets – were clean. He loved Schubert’s early symphonies as they resonated with his pith. What right have I got to demand gimmicky metaphysics from the guy when all he wants to do is tramp down the Via Media and briskly so? If Abbado avoids the domain where “the wild things are”, who am I to demand otherwise?

Take, for example, his first Beethoven cycle with the Vienna Philharmonic. Here, he’s being true to himself. It’s nice from beginning to end, underwritten by a Vienna Philharmonic that plays within its polished limits. By any measure, it’s less skeletonized than his later two cycles with the Berliners. Beethoven the Revolutionary is never sighted nor cited. There’s no danger. Undue passion and turbulence are repudiated with good grace and a dollop of niceness. Those with a pacemaker can listen to this Eroica without a care in the world. Polished indeed are the overtures. These polite, low-voltage readings might appeal to the spinster-librarians within our ranks; by any measure, they’re pillars of our society and far more so than partners at Goldman Sachs.

Become what you are. Abbado did. It doesn’t have anything to do with Beethoven but it’s praiseworthy all the same!
1 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9b322d44) étoiles sur 5 Surprisingly demure, non-committal 24 mars 2011
Par Jurgen Lawrenz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
I consider myself fortunate that I have not read any professional critics on this set, so that Mr Beers' comments are the first against which I can measure my own impressions. I share his point of view that "progressive" expectations are not only nonsense, but can be downright pernicious. The only relevant criterion is the interpreter delivering a perspective on a musical experience that allows us to relive (even though at second hand) the spiritual message of Beethoven' works. They are, I think by universal agreement, the peak of western symphonic music; and this is hardly because they are pretty entertainment or, for that matter, exhibition pieces for conductors and orchestras.
Let me assure the reader first of all that the sound is excellent, so that we can push this item out of the way that record reviewers seem always to harp on. The only justification for this is, if the sound is actually bad. This is very good.
I am also of the opinion that no-one should write a review after just one audition. I have now heard all these performances three times, never all in a row, and each symphony side by side with one or two competitors. This procedure can realign previous judgements, or correct faulty memories. Most importantly, it can reveal something of the intensity, commitment and care of the performers. On that basis, I have to say now that Abbado shows a surprising indifference to some of these symphonies. Further, that the Vienna Philharmonic on those occasions fall into a mechanical routine that argues for a lack of interest. They never play in a sloppy way, not by any means. But take as an example, the introduction to the 4th symphony: the playing here is quite wooden, four-square; but when you turn to Böhm with the same orchestra, that story suddenly turns into a minidrama with skillful adjustments to the ebb and flow of phrases. After the fortissimo announcements, the violins in Böhm dance on their toes (figuratively speaking), while in Abbado they are seated and just play the notes.
The third movement of the Pastoral symphony exhibits exactly the same kind of reluctance by the players to put joy and brio into what they are doing. I use these two examples to indicate a recurring problem in Abbado's set. It seems to me that he is not thinking with Beethoven, but reading the score. A most important quality, enthusiasm, is largely missing. This perfunctoriness pervades all the early and middle symphonies. It is sometimes obscured by the relatively brisk tempi he adopts, which insinuate a modest kind of excitement (e.g. in the 5th symphony). But without enthusiasm, insight is not attainable. I for one would not want novelty, nor an insistence on outmoded traditions. But enthusiasm is crucial, the heart of the matter.
As a result such a major work as the Eroica comes across as sorely underpowered. Power does not mean speed here, but the inner voltage that drives the musical progress forward. Klemperer takes almost two minutes more than Abbado for the first movement, but the sheer force of his drive sweeps you along. With mild exaggeration it could be said that Abbado provides a nice musical canvas while you're doing something else. Klemperer grabs you by the scruff of the neck.
With the later symphonies, matters improve slightly. His 7th and 8th symphonies convey some of the spirited brio that was lacking earlier, but still not enough I feel. Compare e.g. Solti or Giulini (Chicago) or Karajan (Berlin 1962) for what "powerful" means in this context: not undue speed or huge climaxes, but the voltage that is conveys an impression of grandeur to a listener.
The best of what he can do, Abbado reserved for the 9th symphony. At long last, the first movement is a real powerhouse, as if hewn out of a block of granite. Indeed it is (on the clock) one of the slowest readings, fully 2 minutes longer than Karajan, Szell, Wand and some others, but it does not sound slow because of the propulsive energy that's behind it. The adagio sounds very Italianate under his hands, and very beautifully so.
But this is, in the end, one really outstanding symphony in a batch of nine. Two or three of the others are good average industry standard.
All these recordings have been issued as separate albums. It means you are able to acquire the better ones without having to buy the whole set.
As a complete survey, this is not a great success. It does not do justice to the real abilities of either Abbado or the Vienna Philharmonic.
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