Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 8,36

Économisez
EUR 0,85 (9%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

The Third Secret: A Novel of Suspense par [Berry, Steve]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

The Third Secret: A Novel of Suspense Format Kindle


Voir les 16 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Format Kindle, 17 mai 2005
EUR 8,36
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 30,17 EUR 2,02
Poche
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 9,26 EUR 0,01
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 0,59

Longueur : 400 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

Amazon.com

For Steve Berry, it's a fortuitous coincidence that his third novel, a Vatican-centered conspiracy thriller titled The Third Secret, was published in the immediate aftermath of Pope Benedict XVI's anointment in Rome. While this exuberantly contrived yarn would likely have drawn an audience at any time, it benefits from coming before readers just after they've been primed with news reports about papal succession, the relative influence and legacy of pontiffs, and the increasing tug-of-war between Roman Catholic progressives and conservative traditionalists.

Set in the near future, Secret introduces Jakob Volkner--Pope Clement XV--a German "caretaker pope" who, nearing the age of 80, was elected as John Paul II's successor. But three years into his papacy, the thoughtful Clement has begun to quietly express skepticism about papal infallibility and the Church's restrictive dogma, and to make odd requests of his longtime secretary, Monsignor Colin Michener, an Irish-born but American-reared priest whose vows of celibacy have been tested--and found wanting. Clement has also made repeated visits to a guarded sanctum within the Vatican archives, where sacred and historic documents are stored. And he's dispatched Michener to Romania to locate an elderly cleric who, in the 1950s, translated three cryptic prophecies, purportedly offered by the Virgin Mary in 1917 to a trio of children in Fatima, Portugal. Those secrets have since been fully disclosed to the world. Or have they? That’s the question facing Michener in the wake of Clement's shocking suicide, as he pursues a twisted trail of clues, crimes, and religious forecasts from Rome to Bosnia to Germany, accompanied by his former lover, journalist Katerina Lew. But making any additional secrets known to the world will put Michener in confrontation with doctrinal reactionaries, led by Cardinal Alberto Valendrea, the Vatican's Italian secretary of state, who's determined to follow Clement as the Vicar of Christ--even if that requires inventing a few new sins and flouting a 900-year-old prediction of doom for the next pope.

Attorney-author Berry, praised previously for The Amber Room and The Romanov Prophecy, enriches The Third Secret with glimpses behind the locked doors of a papal selection process and knowledge of centuries-old Catholic prognostications that, while employed judiciously in these pages, nonetheless suggest a prodigious amount of research. He's less successful with his casting. Valendrea is a wincingly unnuanced scoundrel, and Ms. Lew achieves scarce definition beyond being a raven-tressed temptress to powerful prelates. Thankfully, Berry does better by Michener, who finds himself at a crossroads, carrying on in Clement's name even as he searches for confirmation that his own life of devotion and service has been meaningful. Although the secrets "revealed" in this tale seem more controversial than plausible, and a potentially intriguing subplot about the excommunication of a maverick priest ends up as a throwaway device, The Third Secret builds to a conclusion that is as suspenseful and stunning as it is inevitable. Have faith. --J. Kingston Pierce

Extrait

Vatican City
Wednesday, November 8th, The Present
6:15 a.m.


Monsignor Colin Michener heard the sound again and closed the book. Somebody was there. He knew it.

Like before.

He stood from the reading desk and stared around at the array of baroque shelves. The ancient bookcases towered above him and more stood at attention down narrow halls that spanned in both directions. The cavernous room carried an aura, a mystique bred in part by its label. L’ Archivio Segreto Vaticano. The Secret Archives of the Vatican.

He’d always thought that name strange since little contained within the volumes was secret. Most were merely the meticulous record of two millennia of Church organization, the accounts from a time when popes were kings, warriors, politicians, and lovers. All told there were twenty-five miles of shelves which offered much if a searcher knew where to look.

And Michener certainly did.

Re-focusing on the sound, his gaze drifted across the room, past frescos of Constantine, Pepin, and Frederick II, before settling on an iron grille at the far side. The space beyond the grille was dark and quiet. The Riserva was accessed only by direct papal authority, the key to the grille held by the Church’s archivist. Michener had never entered that chamber, though he’d stood dutifully outside while his boss, Pope Clement XV, ventured inside. Even so, he was aware of some of the precious documents that windowless space contained. The last letter of Mary, Queen of Scots, before she was beheaded by Elizabeth I. The petitions of seventy-five English lords asking the pope to annul Henry VIII’s first marriage. Galileo’s signed confession. Napoleon’s Treaty of Tolentino.

He studied the cresting and buttresses of the iron grille, a gilded frieze of foliage and animals hammered into the metal above. The gate itself had stood since the fourteenth century. Nothing in Vatican City was ordinary. Everything carried the distinctive mark of a renowned artist or a legendary craftsman, someone who’d labored for years trying to please both his God and his pope.

He strode across the room, his footfalls echoing through the tepid air, and stopped at the iron gate. A warm breeze swept past him from beyond the grille. The right side of the portal was dominated by a huge hasp. He tested the bolt. Locked and secure.

He turned back, wondering if one of the staff had entered the archives. The duty scriptor had departed when he’d arrived earlier and no one else would be allowed inside while he was there, since the papal secretary needed no babysitter. But there were a multitude of doors that led in and out, and he wondered if the noise he’d heard moments ago was that of ancient hinges being worked open, then gently closed. It was hard to tell. Sound within the great expanse was as confused as the writings.

He stepped to his right, toward one of the long corridors–the Hall of Parchments. Beyond was the Room of Inventories and Indexes. As he walked, overhead bulbs flashed on and off, casting a succession of light pools, and he felt as if he was underground, though he was two stories up.

He ventured only a little way, heard nothing, then turned around.

It was early in the day and mid-week. He’d chosen this time for his research deliberately–less chance of impeding others who’d gained access to the archives, and less chance of attracting the attention of Curial employees. He was on a mission for the Holy Father, his inquiries private, but he was not alone. The last time, a week ago, he’d sensed the same thing.

He re-entered the main hall and stepped back to the reading desk, his attention still on the room. The floor was a zodiacal diagram oriented to the sun, its rays able to penetrate thanks to carefully positioned slits high in the walls. He knew that centuries ago the Gregorian calendar had been calculated at this precise spot. Yet no sunlight leaked in today. Outside was cold and wet, a mid-autumn rainstorm pelting Rome.

The volumes that had held his attention for the past two hours were neatly arranged on the lectern. Many had been composed within the past two decades. Four were much older. Two of the oldest were written in Italian, one was in Spanish, the other in Portuguese. He could read all of them with ease–another reason Clement XV coveted his employment.

The Spanish and Italian accounts were of little value, both re-hashes of the Portuguese work: A Comprehensive and Detailed Study of the Reported Apparitions of the Holy Virgin Mary at Fatima—May 13, 1917 to October 13, 1917.

Pope Benedict XV had ordered the investigation in 1922 as part of the Church’s investigation into what supposedly had occurred in a remote Portuguese valley. The entire manuscript was handwritten, the ink faded to a warm yellow so the words appeared as if they were scripted in gold. The Bishop of Leira had performed a thorough inquiry, spending eight years in all, and the information later became critical in the 1930 acknowledgment by the Vatican that the Virgin’s six earthly appearances at Fatima were worthy of assent. Three appendices, now attached to the original, were generated in the 1950s, 60s, and 90s.

Michener had studied them all with the thoroughness of the lawyer he’d been trained by the Church to be. Seven years at the University of Munich had earned him his degrees, yet he’d never practiced law conventionally. His was a world of ecclesiastical pronouncements and canonical decrees. Precedent spanned two millennia and relied more on an understanding of the times than on any notion of stare decisis. His arduous legal training had become invaluable to his Church service, as the logic of the law had many times become an ally in the confusing mire of divine politics. More importantly, it had just helped him find in this labyrinth of forgotten information what Clement XV wanted.

The sound came again.

A soft squeak, like two limbs rubbing together in a breeze, or a mouse announcing its presence.

He rushed toward the source and glanced both ways.

Nothing.

Fifty feet off to the left, a door led out of the archive. He approached the portal and tested the lock. It yielded. He strained to open the heavy slab of carved oak and the iron hinges squealed ever so slightly.

A sound he recognized.

The hallway beyond was empty, but a gleam on the marble floor caught his attention.

He knelt.

The transparent clumps of moisture came with regularity, the droplets leading off into the corridor, then back through the doorway into the archive. Suspended within some were remnants of mud, leaves, and grass.

He followed the trail with his gaze which stopped at the end of a row of shelves. Rain continued to pound the roof.

He knew the puddles for what they were.

Footprints.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1497 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 400 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 0345476131
  • Editeur : Ballantine Books (17 mai 2005)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B000FCK4OK
  • Synthèse vocale : Non activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Lecteur d’écran : Pris en charge
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : Soyez la première personne à écrire un commentaire sur cet article
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°195.566 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  • Voulez-vous nous parler de prix plus bas?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoile

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 3.9 étoiles sur 5 376 commentaires
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 New Angle on Old Secret 19 mars 2014
Par Nancy J. Dolan - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
A very interesting insight into today's problems with the clergy. I, a staunch Roman Catholic, cannot fathom why the church would demand celibacy from its priests. The Apostles were married. God made Adam and Eve. Other Christian religious are married. Yes, I understand there may be a problem for a priest with a curious wife, but I think more men would be happy and satisfied with a loving and respectful wife, as God intended us. Today, especially, it seems too lonely a life for anyone to lead. It's not exactly what God foresaw. At least I don't think so, otherwise, why would he create Eve?

Back in the 15th, 16th, 17th century, there were some vile Popes. In my opinion, the Church, meaning well but also with the intent of keeping females as "second-class citizens," did its best to keep males, albeit single males, in supremacy.

And, yes, I devoutly believe in apparitions of the BVM. Just as I use her as an intercessor when I desire something but don't receive a favor when I want it, she is using us as intercessors to achieve world peace through prayer. Prayer is powerful! Belief is powerful! They can both work!
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 This could have been so much better 16 septembre 2013
Par Eulenspiegel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche Achat vérifié
I began reading the book expecting some exciting twists and turns before arriving at a blockbuster ending. The twists and turns were there, though some really defied credibility.The main characters held my interest, though the villains (Valendrea and Ambrosi) were too unredeemably evil and unsubtle to be believable. As the tension mounted, what I looked forward to was learning what revelations had been hidden for so many years. And then... I found out. What a colossal disappointment! If I were a Roman Catholic, I might have been insulted by the heretical nature of the contents. As a mainstream Protestant, I was insulted by the sheer stupidity -- and the author's laziness in not coming up with something better. Such a let down! I finished the book, hoping that there still might be something worth reading. Sorry I wasted my time. Two points for okay storytelling. Three points lacking for the unbelievable popes, ridiculous plot points, and a message that Mary never would have wasted her time on.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Terrific Suspense with an Educational Twist 30 août 2015
Par SIROCCO - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
This was one of Berry's first novels. It is an extremely well researched suspense novel similar (but better) than his more recent books. Religious dogma is questioned and related to several philosophical and moral issues. Character development is outstanding as is the introspection involving personal relationships. We won't give away the plot except to say that rarely have we encountered a novel that we couldn't put aside. We burned the midnight oil on this one!
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Master Story Teller 12 octobre 2015
Par Swayzar - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Love the factual history that Steve Berry puts in all his books. Although the plot conclusion makes an impressive reasonable resolution for a fiction story, it surprised me that it would go that direction. This author is a master of weaving a fiction story into the accurate and DETAILED facts of history. I find myself stopping and going to google to learn more about the fascinating places, items and events he is describing. Although in a couple of his books, I distinctly disagree with the fictional way he concluded his subject matter, I accept that that is his writers privilege. Even at that the pieces of his story fit so smoothly and agreeably that it makes an excellent read. Also what an exciting way to learn about so much.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A hero I'd like to know 8 mai 2017
Par Xoc - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I love all Berry's books, but this one was better than some, and a little different. The hero was not a trained agent of some kind (those are good too). It's a bit hard to say much without spoiling the plot. I could not put it down and enjoyed the philosophical discussion as much as the action.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous