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The Voyage of the Beagle (English Edition) par [Darwin, Charles]
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The Voyage of the Beagle (English Edition) Format Kindle

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Longueur : 306 pages Word Wise: Activé Langue : Anglais

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

Many people who have planned to read The Voyage of the Beagle and been deterred by its length and scientific aspects will find the answer here in a carefully and skillfully abridged edition, cut to half the length, which gives the continuity of text, Darwin's own words, and the observations and episodes that make it memorable as a human document. Here is a classic, the record of an enquiring mind seeking scientific truth. Here is evident the growth of the man. An introductory biography places the importance of this trip in Darwin's life; introductory bits for each chapter provide an analysis of the voyage and its scientific meaning along with the actual text. This work is significant in view of additional material available in the last 35 years, much of it Darwin's own writings, but hitherto unpublished in book form. A bibliography provides not only original sources but additional material for study. --Kirkus Reviews

Présentation de l'éditeur

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 937 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 306 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 1619492814
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Illimité
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B004TOYF40
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Non activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.0 étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires client
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Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Being invited in your early twenties to take part in a 5-year journey around the world must have felt like a tremendous recognition. Charles Darwin made the most of such a glorious opportunity. In this book you see him exploring and discovering previously unknown parts of South America, among them the famed Galapagos Islands,thereby producing one of the most fascinating travel writings I have ever read. But above all you see a genius at work, always investigating, tinkering and cogitating with an unsatiable curiosity. This seminal contribution to various sciences is groundbreaking in itself. Don't expect a treaty on evolution though. That will come much later in his life. But in hindsight the voyage aboard the Beagle forshadowed the most exciting discovery of the XIXth century.
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Par 2nimm TOP 500 COMMENTATEURS le 28 juillet 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
livre anglophone broché souple petit format papier recyclé réédition de 1997 du journal de voyage de Darwin sur le Beagle; il est toujours intéressant d'avoir ce texte chez soi même si il serait peut-être plus agréable de l'avoir dans une édition illustrée plus luxueuse pour bibliothèque que celle-ci vraiment basique
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Format: Broché
Remember this says "Journal" and that is what it is. It is his first parson adventures on and off the Beagle. He even includes stories about the people on the ship, the ship's life, and maintenance. He is always going ashore and venturing beyond the ship charter to go where no Englishman has gone before. He makes friends with tyrants and the down trodden. Once to get an animal to come to him, he lay on his back and waved his arms and legs in the air. What ever you do, do not turn your back on him. He is always knocking something on the head and taking it back for study. It is fun trying to match the old names for places with the new.
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Format: Broché
Bonne édition écrite, même s'il s'agit d'une édition compacte et concise de l'original, elle dispose de très peu d'images hélas.
Good edition, even if it is a concise and compact edition of the original, it has very few pictures, unfortunately.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x90a2f2c4) étoiles sur 5 138 commentaires
204 internautes sur 213 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90a4cf78) étoiles sur 5 Caution, this is an abridgement. 19 décembre 2002
Par Joseph W. Trigg - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I bought this version when I could not find my old copy. On trying to find a favorite passage (Darwin's revulsion at a parasitic wasp in Brazil and the inconsistency of such cruelty with any providential design of nature by a good God), I noticed that it was not there. I do not know what else is missing. I find it infuriating that this was not adequately noted on the cover of the book. I always prefer books as the author wrote them, especially when the author is Darwin. This is a lively, beautiful and haunting work that I first read when I was thirteen and have read twice since. Readers deserve the whole thing.
82 internautes sur 84 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90a4cfcc) étoiles sur 5 Charles Darwin as Indiana Jones 28 septembre 2004
Par Vincent Poirier - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
We all know Charles Darwin as a scholarly bearded old English gentleman, and like Leonardo da Vinci, Darwin has this image defining him for all future generations. Even though most everyone knows Darwin spent five years traveling the oceans on the HMS Beagle, the image of a young dynamic Darwin never takes over. Reading this book will change this.

Darwin sailed on the Beagle, a small three-mast sailing ship, and circumnavigated the globe. Over five years, he visited numerous islands in the Atlantic and Pacific and extensively surveyed the east and west coasts of South America. He hiked up and down mountains, traveled on horseback across the arid Argentinean plains, crossed the lonely Peruvian desert, and trekked the grandiose Chilean Cordilleras. He thought nothing of packing a train of mules for a two-month overland journey across the Andes going from Chile to Argentina and back again. On all his land expeditions he hired local guides, from Gauchos in Argentina to South Pacific islanders in Tahiti. Darwin's accounts of his expeditions are not only interesting adventures, they are also good portraits of the people he met. These include Latin American governors and generals, Argentinean ranchers, very primitive natives on Tierra del Fuego, and so on.

The journal begins with an account of Cape de Verd islands, then most of the book is spent on Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and we have to wait until Chapter 17 before we get to what all Darwin fans really want to read, namely the account of his visit to the Galapagos. Though short, the account does not disappoint. We read of Darwin's finches, of two allied species of lizards, and of the giant turtles. Darwin also presents his great insight: that geographical isolation contributes to speciation. He came by this insight when it was pointed out to him that nearly identical species were seldom found on the same island. Another insight was that the fauna and flora an island depends more on that of the nearby mainland than on latitude. For example the plants of the Galapagos Islands were similar to those of the American west coast, while those of Cape de Verd, at the same latitude but in the Atlantic, resembled plants found in Africa. Darwin then continues with accounts of Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia, where we read how he thought coral reef islands were formed.

In the last chapter Darwin tells us of his visit to St-Helena and he does in fact mention its most famous resident, Napoleon Bonaparte. Though the French Emperor had already died, his remains had not yet been moved to Les Invalides in Paris. Darwin writes of the grave only in passing and is explicitly careful not too make too much of it. Apparently visitors in those days had a habit of overdoing their descriptions of Napoleon's rather simple headstone.

Travel notes like these and the descriptions of the people he met, were for me the most charming aspect of the book. The portraits Darwin paints are invariably sympathetic to human nature. Certainly Darwin was a man of his times and valued civilization very highly, but he was no racist and believed that all men could find happiness and enlightenment, and that all men had a right to be free. He despised slavery, and wrote eloquent passages attacking the prevalent institution. From this journal, we come to know a dynamic, adventurous young man, and a thoughtful liberal one who would only later shake our view of our place in the world.
80 internautes sur 84 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90a59420) étoiles sur 5 Penguin Version is abridged, with no warning on the cover 17 décembre 2003
Par Timothy J. Cliffe - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
The 1 star is for Penguin, because the cover does not warn you that the content has been sharply abridged. Darwin's thinking and writing are wonderful -- but grossly and unfairly cut to ribbons.
40 internautes sur 40 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90a597ec) étoiles sur 5 Charles Darwin as Indiana Jones 28 septembre 2004
Par Vincent Poirier - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
We all know Charles Darwin as a scholarly bearded old English gentleman, and like Leonardo da Vinci, Darwin has this image defining him for all future generations. Even though most everyone knows Darwin spent five years traveling the oceans on the HMS Beagle, the image of a young dynamic Darwin never takes over. Reading this book will change this.

Darwin sailed on the Beagle, a small three-mast sailing ship, and circumnavigated the globe. Over five years, he visited numerous islands in the Atlantic and Pacific and extensively surveyed the east and west coasts of South America. He hiked up and down mountains, traveled on horseback across the arid Argentinean plains, crossed the lonely Peruvian desert, and trekked the grandiose Chilean Cordilleras. He thought nothing of packing a train of mules for a two-month overland journey across the Andes going from Chile to Argentina and back again. On all his land expeditions he hired local guides, from Gauchos in Argentina to South Pacific islanders in Tahiti. Darwin's accounts of his expeditions are not only interesting adventures, they are also good portraits of the people he met. These include Latin American governors and generals, Argentinean ranchers, very primitive natives on Tierra del Fuego, and so on.

The journal begins with an account of Cape de Verd islands, then most of the book is spent on Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and we have to wait until Chapter 17 before we get to what all Darwin fans really want to read, namely the account of his visit to the Galapagos. Though short, the account does not disappoint. We read of Darwin's finches, of two allied species of lizards, and of the giant turtles. Darwin also presents his great insight: that geographical isolation contributes to speciation. He came by this insight when it was pointed out to him that nearly identical species were seldom found on the same island. Another insight was that the fauna and flora an island depends more on that of the nearby mainland than on latitude. For example the plants of the Galapagos Islands were similar to those of the American west coast, while those of Cape de Verd, at the same latitude but in the Atlantic, resembled plants found in Africa. Darwin then continues with accounts of Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia, where we read how he thought coral reef islands were formed.

In the last chapter Darwin tells us of his visit to St-Helena and he does in fact mention its most famous resident, Napoleon Bonaparte. Though the French Emperor had already died, his remains had not yet been moved to Les Invalides in Paris. Darwin writes of the grave only in passing and is explicitly careful not too make too much of it. Apparently visitors in those days had a habit of overdoing their descriptions of Napoleon's rather simple headstone.

Travel notes like these and the descriptions of the people he met, were for me the most charming aspect of the book. The portraits Darwin paints are invariably sympathetic to human nature. Certainly Darwin was a man of his times and valued civilization very highly, but he was no racist and believed that all men could find happiness and enlightenment, and that all men had a right to be free. He despised slavery, and wrote eloquent passages attacking the prevalent institution. From this journal, we come to know a dynamic, adventurous young man, and a thoughtful liberal one who would only later shake our view of our place in the world.
48 internautes sur 51 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90a598d0) étoiles sur 5 This Kindle edition stinks-- no pictures 12 juillet 2011
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This free Kindle edition stinks-- no pictures. Darwin refers to the illustrations in the text, but they are not there. Get the Kindle Version With Images from Gutenberg.org instead, which otherwise is the same text, right down to the page numbers which are included just as text on their own line (and that's where footnotes are included too.)
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