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Le Voyeur

5.0 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires client

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Détails sur le produit

  • Acteurs : Carl Boehm, Anna Massey, Maxine Audley, Moira Shearer, Brenda Bruce
  • Réalisateurs : Carl Boehm, Anna Massey, Maxine Audley, Moira Shearer, Brenda Bruce
  • Format : Anamorphique, Couleur, Plein écran, Mono, PAL, Cinémascope
  • Audio : Allemand (Dolby Digital 1.0), Anglais (PCM Mono), Français (PCM Mono), Espagnol (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Sous-titres : Français
  • Région : Région 2 (Ce DVD ne pourra probablement pas être visualisé en dehors de l'Europe. Plus d'informations sur les formats DVD/Blu-ray.).
  • Rapport de forme : 1.75:1
  • Nombre de disques : 1
  • Studio : Universal Music
  • Date de sortie du DVD : 15 avril 2002
  • Durée : 97 minutes
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires client
  • ASIN: B00004VXRX
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 192.546 en DVD & Blu-ray (Voir les 100 premiers en DVD & Blu-ray)
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Description du produit

Le Voyeur (Peeping Tom), 1 DVD, 97 minutes

Synopsis

Mark Lewis est cameraman dans un studio cinématographique. À ses heures perdues, il prend des photographies de nus, vendues sous le manteau dans des kiosques à journaux. Le père de Mark, scientifique de renom, consacra sa vie à l'étude de la psychologie de la peur, utilisant son propre fils comme cobaye. Mark, aujourd'hui adulte, est devenu un tueur fou, obsédé par la peur et qui filme l'agonie de ses victimes...

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Format: DVD
Très beau film, à l'histoire violente (très violente pour un film de 1960), doit beaucoup au réalisateur M. Powell, qui rencontrera quelques problèmes dans la suite de sa carrière à cause de ce film, et à l' excellente interprétation de Karl Böehm, qui joue à merveille le rôle d'un psychopate qui prends du plaisir à faire peur et à tuer des femmes en les filmant en train de voir leurs propre mort dans un miroir fixer sur sa caméra.
Ce film nous plonge dans une ambiance très spéciale et on sait pas jusqu'où va aller le tueur, quelles sont ses limites. On le suit tout on long du film, et une bonne partie dans l'oeil de sa caméra. Petit détail encore, une excellente bande son entièrement jazz. A voir absolument !
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Format: DVD
Film superbe, aux couleurs (technicolor) magnifiques et parfaitement mises en valeur par le DVD. L'histoire (horrible) est traitée très finement, en une progression oppressante et un final qui explique une certaine folie. Karl Böehm est plus que parfait dans le rôle.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8d0f5b64) étoiles sur 5 99 commentaires
53 internautes sur 54 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8d13ef6c) étoiles sur 5 Disturbing and all the more memorable for it 3 avril 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Cassette vidéo
Michael Powell is one of the great British film directors, his credits including such diverse fare as The Thief of Baghdad, the Red Shoes and the unforgettable Stairway to Heaven. Peeping tom was his first and only foray into horror.Though this film is often compared to Psycho (Powell worked with Hitchcock in the 20's and 30's before Hitch moved to the States), it is different in several respects. First, the film is told entirely from the point of view of the killer. we don't have the luxury of really getting to know our victims the way Hitch lets us know Marion Crane. Secondly, our killer, Mark Lewis (played quietly by Karl Boehm), seems to regard his being caught by police as inevitable, and is in fact preparing to film his apprehenshion as part of his perverse "fear documentary". Thirdly, Powell filmed his masterpiece in sickeningly vivid color, allowing us no distance between the killer and his acts.The film was critically reviled upon its initial release in 1960. Though sad, it's easy to understand. Powell wanted to include the audience in Mark's disturbing voyeurism, essentially implicating them as well. Since film are essentially a socially acceptable form of voyeurism, it's easy to see why critics, who make their living watching movies, might have been insulted. Since critics are to the arts what pigeons are to statuary, they deserve it.Many people might shrink from this movie due to its disturbing nature and lurid subject matter. Too bad. It's very well made and has something pertinent to say about cinema, human psychology, and the world around us. Many people sometimes think that movies about bad people are bad cinema. The only depressing movies are badly made ones. Peeping Tom is a great movie about a bad person.
32 internautes sur 33 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8d1bcda4) étoiles sur 5 Disturbing Psychological Horror 18 mars 2000
Par Richard A Martin - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This wonderfully creepy 1960 horror film predates Psycho by about 3 months and predates the "slasher" film by about 16 years and, in braving new ground which deviated from the Gothic Horror film movement spawned by Hammer Films in 1957, helped move horror from the Gothic castles to the house next door.Michael Powell's film presents us with a young man who is so fascinated by the subject of fear, that he stalks young women and kills them while filming their deaths with his movie camera. In to the young man's world, comes a young woman who only wants to understand him and love him, but will she find out his horrible secret before its too late?While lambasted by critics who condemend the film for being "The sickets and filthiest film I can remember seeing . . .", Peeping Tom in one of the most interesting horror films of the early 60s. It was the critical attacks against the film and Powell himself which prompted Hitchcock not to have a critics screening for his new film about a killer, "Psycho", which premiered a few months later.This Criterion release has all the thrills of the laser disk release (trailers, audio commentary, still gallery) plus a wonderful BBC documentary on the making of Peeping Tom called "A Very British Psycho".A fine presention of a classicly disturbing film. WELL DONE !
19 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8d1fc2a0) étoiles sur 5 A masterpiece of horror grounded in reality 9 avril 2005
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
When Peeping Tom was first released in 1960, it was universally reviled by critics and audiences alike for its sadism and mixing of sex and violence, and essentially ended the career of its director, Michael Powell. To say it was misunderstood at the time would be an understatement, as over time it has come to be recognized as a masterpiece of filmmaking. It is often compared with Psycho in terms of shock value, but Peeping Tom's Mark Lewis makes Norman Bates look like the Easter Bunny by comparison.

Carl Boehm plays Mark Lewis, by day a camera assistant at a film studio, by night a photographer for girly magazines who murders women and films them while he's doing so. Why does he do so? It gives him a sexual rush to see the fear in their eyes when they realize they are going to be killed. His father was a biologist, he explains to Helen (Anna Massey), a young woman who lives in his building, and his father was especially interested in fear in children, so he made Mark a test subject. You can see the connection here: a bruised childhood leading to abnormal adult behavior.

The relationship between Mark and Helen is a peculiar one. She is terribly curious about him; at first she seems to think he's a nice young man, but during their first encounter, Mark shows her some strange film and she becomes outraged, yet she does not run away. Her interest in him seems to only grow, despite his clearly creepy ways. In an ordinary film, Mark would be a villain, and we would hate him, because he is a murderer. But what Peeping Tom asks is for us to sympathize with this man, because it is not entirely his fault that he is the way he is. The major conflict in the film is between Mark and himself, as he struggles to suppress his urges and contain his own fears.

This is a horror movie, but the only monster is a human, and that makes it all the more frightful, because it is horror rooted in reality. There are sick people like Mark Lewis out there in the world, and you read about them in the newspaper just about every day. Peeping Tom doesn't terrify with "Boo!" moments, but rather it works on a more cerebral level, letting the audience into the twisted mind of a killer.

So why was this film such a topic of controversy in 1960? Well, never before were audiences asked to look upon a sadistic killer as anything but an irredeemable evil person, and nobody was really expecting that. This film is the kind that is intended to disturb instead of entertain, and when you go to a movie expecting to be entertained and end up being disturbed instead, you tend not to look favorably on the movie. Peeping Tom has been an incredibly influential film for today's filmmakers, as its influences can be seen in films from Road to Perdition to Red Dragon. I highly recommend it to any fan of film and film history.
28 internautes sur 34 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8cfc17e0) étoiles sur 5 Subversive at the time, mild today 6 janvier 2004
Par Jeffrey Leach - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
When British director Michael Powell and screenwriter Leo Marks collaborated on the 1960 film "Peeping Tom," the two really thought they had something special. The movie about a mentally unstable young man caught in the clutches of his father's psychological experiments horrified audiences and critics alike. Obscene, depraved, wildly inappropriate--these were only a few of the milder labels attached to the film. The movie played less than a week in cinema houses throughout Britain before disappearing. Powell, come to find out, was so devastated by the response to his movie that he promptly left England for Australia, never to return. In our crazy modern world, what people thought horribly twisted yesterday has an allure beyond reckoning for today's cranks. Thus, "Peeping Tom" has now become a movie lionized by modern filmmakers, students of film history, and critics. The Criterion Collection's release of the movie goes so far as to call Powell's film a "British 'Psycho.'" Well, I wouldn't go that far, but the movie is intriguing considering the date of its release (1960) and the subject matter it fearlessly tackles.
Mark Lewis (Carl Boehm) spends his days working the cameras at a film studio and his nights moonlighting as pin-up photographer and documentarian. He always carries a camera wherever he goes, photographing seemingly mundane objects as buildings and people. Lewis seems like a harmless sort of chap, but the dark secrets swirling in his mind would give the stoutest soul pause. He is a Peeping Tom, always gazing into windows or using his camera to spy on the intimate details of other people's lives. His illness seems to come from his childhood, when his famous psychologist father used Mark as a test subject in his work on human fears. Father would set up a camera in different rooms of the house, along with a tape recorder, and proceed to torment his son in various ways in order to monitor the boy's reaction. At some point in the proceedings, young Mark equated women with his terror fits, and as a full grown man he has decided to conduct his own amateur experiments. With camera and tripod firmly in tow, Lewis tricks women into situations where he can murder them and record their fear on celluloid. His first victim is a woman of the night, the next a would be actress at the studio. Mark initially gets away with his crimes because he blends easily into the background. He's polite to a fault, quiet in manner and movement, and solitary. He spends most of his time in the huge dark room at his house, endlessly replaying his sordid film footage and anguishing over his painful childhood.
Enter Helen Stephens (Anna Massey), an aspiring author and tenant in Lewis's house. Young Stephens notices Mark when she sees him staring into her apartment during her birthday party. Intrigued, Helen follows Lewis up to his apartment, discovers he owns the house and acts as its landlord, and witnesses some of his bizarre behavior. Despite the uneasiness of their first meeting, Mark and Helen become fast friends. In fact, Lewis takes such a shine to Helen that the mere idea of "photographing" her--code for committing another murder--shocks him to the very marrow of his being. Helen really likes this man even though her blind, alcoholic mother despises young Lewis because she has an intuition that he is up to no good. Things begin to turn south for Mark when the police launch an investigation into the murders, Helen's mother confronts him about his activities, and he learns that his little problem will take years of therapy to overcome. Lewis loses his cool as the authorities close in but discovers a peace of sorts during the film's conclusion.
Modern audiences will scratch their heads as they try to figure out why "Peeping Tom" was so controversial when it first came out. I think the primary reason this movie shocked British moviegoers and critics concerns how the movie presents such an appalling criminal as a figure worthy of sympathy and outright pity. No one wants to feel for a murderer of young women, but Powell's movie often gives Boehm's character endearing traits. When Helen comes to Mark requesting his aid with the photographs in her soon to be published book, Lewis visibly enthuses that anyone would honor him with such a request. The guy is genuinely happy about Helen's success, and further confounds audience perceptions by buying her a very nice brooch for her birthday. He gives her this gift not as a means for tricking her into a situation where he can victimize her, but because he likes her, respects her, and wants her to be happy. There are a few other reasons why "Peeping Tom" scandalized the British film industry, probably reasons best left unelaborated on here, but the film's refusal to judge Mark Lewis's behavior is probably the biggest reason for the insults heaped on this picture.
I liked the film even though it is a relatively bloodless affair. Carl Boehm's performance as the tortured Mark Lewis provides the primary impetus for viewing this film. He captures perfectly the concept of a scared, tormented little boy wrapped in a man's body. Hats off to Criterion as well; they did a grand job with the widescreen picture transfer and the heap of extras included on the disc. There's a stills gallery, a trailer for the film, a lengthy documentary about screenwriter Leo Marks, and a commentary by one of those hoity-toity film historians. Don't go into this movie looking for a gory thriller. What you will find is a colorful, quiet movie about a very disturbed young man looking for a way out of his personal darkness.
14 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8d43296c) étoiles sur 5 The Ultimate In Movie Voyeurism. 14 février 2001
Par David Grant - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
In a day and age where the importance of film in our society grows in leaps and bounds everyday, Michael Powell's devastating and completely unforgettable "Peeping Tom" levels the most convincing argument that we don't just watch films... we live them. The killer in "Peeping Tom" is a kind, shy, almost child-like man who, as the son of a scientist father forever obsessed with the fear of children, was tormented as a child. Many times his father would shine lights in the sleeping boy's eyes or drop lizards onto his bed in order to frighten the child, all the while recording his reactions on film. When the boy grows up, he carries on his father's work... maybe a little too well. He decides that the greatest fear experienced comes at the point of death. He conceals a knife in the tripod of his ever-present camera and films his victims as they slowly realize their fate. He also (in a move Hitchcock would envy) forces them to watch their own frightened faces with a small mirror attached to the front of the camera. He desires fear and he goes to extreme lengths to achieve it in his victims. The movie not only asks us to sympathize with the killer (played with a certain charm and yet an air of repellance by Carl Boehm) but also participate in his crimes. We see what he sees while filming them, while watching his footage at home, we are (very eerily) immersed into his film. We are right beside him, watching his victims and relishing in their terror. The camera the killer carries is more of an extension of himself then merely a way of recording what he sees. When his lovely neighbor kisses him, his face remains immobile, as if he doesn't quite know what's going on. But when she walks into the next room, he places his lips onto the lense of the camera and a look of pure passion crosses his face. When she is asking for his opinion on where she should place the pin he has given to her for a birthday present, his hands follow hers as if recording their movement. It is a film about film and about the experience of a moviegoer. Like Hitchcock's "Rear Window" it is a truly exhilarating and unnerving experience about sitting in a theater and not only watching what is going on, but living it. And loving it. No matter what is going on in front of your eyes. A classic.
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