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Who: The A Method for Hiring par [Smart, Geoff, Street, Randy]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

Who: The A Method for Hiring Format Kindle

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Longueur : 208 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Your #1 Problem

What does a who problem look like?

Remember the I Love Lucy episode where Lucy and Ethel find work at a candy factory? They’re supposed to be wrapping chocolates, but they can’t keep up with the pace. So instead of letting the candy pass them by, they start shoving it into their mouths, down their shirts, and anywhere else it will fit. That’s when a supervisor looks in and congratulates the new hires on the empty conveyor belt. Then she calls to someone in the next room, “Speed it up!” And with that the chaos really ensues.

You could spend countless hours trying to optimize the line, but that wouldn’t get to the heart of the matter. The supervisor didn’t have a conveyor problem. She had a Lucy problem.

The Lucy problem is a who problem, but chances are yours is neither as funny nor so far down the chain of command. As an engineering friend of ours often laments, “Managing is easy, except for the people part!”

In an October 2006 cover story, “The Search for Talent,” The Economist reported that finding the right people is the single biggest problem in business today.* We doubt that surprised most readers. The fact is, virtually every manager struggles to find and hire the talent necessary to drive his or her business forward.

We’ve all been there. We’ve all heard the horror stories of the CEO who sank a multibillion-dollar public company, the district manager who allowed his region to fall behind competition, even the executive assistant who couldn’t keep a schedule. Most of us have lived those stories and could add dozens more to the list.

Even we have made bad who decisions. A few years back, Geoff and his wife hired a nanny we’ll call Tammy to look after their children. Unfortunately, Geoff had what his six-year-old calls a “space-out moment” and neglected to apply the method this book describes when he hired her.

Not many months later, Geoff was on the phone in his home office when he saw his two-year-old running naked down the driveway. He immediately hung up on his client and raced outdoors to stop his daughter before she ran into the street. Fortunately, the FedEx truck was not barreling up the driveway at that moment.
Then Geoff went looking for Tammy to find out what had happened. All she could say was, “Well, it’s hard to keep track of all of the kids.” It is, but as Geoff explained to her, that’s exactly what she had been hired to do. Sometimes a who problem can mean life or death.

Needless to say, Geoff’s next nanny search commenced immediately, involved the method presented in this book, and resulted in a much better hire.

The fact is, all of us let our who guard down sometimes. We realize how inflated resumes can be. Yet we accept at face value claims of high accomplishment that we know better than to fully trust. Due diligence, after all, takes time, and time is the one commodity most lacking in busy managers’ lives.
George Buckley grew up with adoptive parents in a boardinghouse in a rough part of Sheffield, England, went to a school for physically handicapped children, and worked his way up to becoming the successful CEO of two Fortune 500 companies, including 3M, where he works now. It’s the sort of background that breeds a healthy skepticism about resumes.

When we met with Buckley, he got straight to the point: “One of the hardest challenges is to hire people from outside the company. One of the basic failures in the hiring process is this: What is a resume? It is a record of a person’s career with all of the accomplishments embellished and all the failures removed.”

Jay Jordan, CEO of the Jordan Company, told us how he once hired a candidate who looked great on paper but failed in the role. The executive demanded some feedback from Jordan on the day of his termination. Jordan didn’t want to add insult to injury, but finally couldn’t stop himself from saying, “Look, I hired your resume. But unfortunately, what I got was you!”

Due diligence is also lacking in what Kelvin Thompson, a top executive recruiter with Heidrick & Struggles, calls “the worst mistake boards make–the ‘la-di-da’ interview: nice lunch, nice chat. They say this is a CEO, and we cannot really interview them. So you have a board who never really interviews the candidates.”

The techniques you will learn in the pages that follow will help everyone–boards, hiring managers at every level, even parents hiring a nanny–find the right who for whatever position needs filling. The method will do the due diligence for you. It lets you focus on the individual candidates without losing sight of the goals and values of your organization.

Before our method can work to its optimal level, though, chances are you might have to break some bad hiring habits of your own.

* The Economist, October 7—13, 2006.

Revue de presse

Advance praise for Who

“Seventy percent of the game is finding the right people, putting them in the right position, listening to them, and alleviating what gets in their way. Who is a practical guide to making sure you get the right people to start with! Excellent advice and guide.”
–Robert Gillette, president and CEO, Honeywell Aerospace

“Geoff Smart and Randy Street have done an amazing job distilling the best advice from some of the world’s most successful business leaders.”
–Wayne Huizenga, founder, Blockbuster Video

“A great read–it really is all about finding, keeping, and motivating the team.” –John Malone, chairman, Liberty Media Corporation

“The key point in this book is that those of us who run companies should include who decisions near the top of the list of strategic priorities.”
–John Varley, group chief executive, Barclays

“Who is the only book you need to read if you are serious about making smart hiring and promotion decisions. It is the most actionable book on middle- and upper-management hiring that I’ve read after twenty years in HR.”
–Ed Evans, executive vice president and chief personnel officer, Allied Waste Industries

“I wish I had this book thirty years ago, at the beginning of my career!”
–Jay Jordan, chairman and CEO, the Jordan Company

“This book will save you and your company time and money. In business, what else is there?”
–Roger Marino, co-founder, EMC Corporation

“You’ll find yourself nodding yes, saying ‘That’s right,’ and thinking, Oh, I’ve been there, all the way through this grand slam of a book. Whether you’re starting a company or running a part of a big one, the level of success you achieve is almost always a result of choosing the right people for the right jobs at the right time. It’s all about the who!”
–Aaron Kennedy, founder and chairman, Noodles & Company

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1255 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 208 pages
  • Editeur : Ballantine Books; Édition : 1 (19 août 2008)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B001EL6RWY
  • Synthèse vocale : Non activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.0 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°37.861 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Loved the book, great easy and efficient read. I find the focus in specialists vs all-around athletes a bit excessive in some cases, but the points are very well made. Worth reading for anyone hiring or looking to be hired!
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Par Jeremie le 18 janvier 2016
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
De bons conseils pour recruter, principalement des "stars" / CEO, mais pas que. Je trouve les réflexions pertinentes et le livre se lit très facilement en quelques heures. Good job.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x93cfcae0) étoiles sur 5 154 commentaires
78 internautes sur 85 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x93cfd678) étoiles sur 5 Fantastic Book on Hiring 30 septembre 2008
Par Clint Greenleaf - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I just finished reading a pre-release copy of the book Who by Geoff Smart and Randy Street. Wow, it's good. Really good.
Geoff and his father Brad Smart are well known as the team that popularized Topgrading, a thorough interview process that takes the success rate for new hires from the average of about 50% to just over 90%. I don't know of a business owner alive who wouldn't love to increase the effectiveness of the interview and hire more effectively.
Smart and Street are experts in their field - they are paid huge sums of money to do this for some of the biggest and best companies in the world. Their research estimates that the average hiring mistake costs employers 15 times the salary of the incorrect hire. The number sounds absurdly high, but when you include salary, lost productivity and opportunity costs, it's plausible. Frightening.
Who is a fast and simple read, but is heavy on content. It begins with a discussion of what they call voodoo hiring, or the process most business owners use during the interview process, and it was painful for me. I'm guilty of voodoo hiring and I'm guessing most of you are, too. Much of my process is guessing and gut feel, and is done over too short of a period of time. It's not hard to see the need for a change.
Next comes a simple explanation of why hiring "A" players is so important. They define an "A" player as the right superstar for the job, a talented person who fits in well with your company culture. B and C hires cost you money; A's make you rich.
The meat of the book is about the four keys to what they call the A Method : Scorecard, Source, Select and Sell. I can't do justice to the brilliance of the system in this short review, but here are the basics. The scorecard is your blueprint for the job - not a description, but the criteria you will be using to judge the person who is ultimately hired. Source is how you find your candidates, primarily referrals and recruiting. Select goes over the four interviews that need to be conducted - screening, Topgrading, focused and reference. Sell is important and often overlooked, selling your top candidate on taking the job. With great people in demand, you need to fight for your best people.
Many of us have read Topgrading - it's a long read but describes the theory well. Even so, countless managers still have trouble implementing the system. Who bridges that gap and helps us see the whole process - then implement it well. This book just became required reading at Greenleaf Book Group, and the process is our new hiring process. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to improve hiring practices and remove a huge piece of the risk.

Clint Greenleaf
CEO, Greenleaf Book Group
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x93cfd6cc) étoiles sur 5 You are WHO you hire 15 janvier 2012
Par Robert T. Hess - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
A companion book to Topgrading by Brad Smart, this little handbook takes the Topgrading concepts to the next level by providing a guide to using Topgrading to improve hiring for your organization. In the world of Topgrading, there are three types of employees: A, B, and C. "A" employees are in the top ten percent of skill and ability for their position. "B" employees are in the next 25 percent, and C employees make up the rest. High performing organizations are filled with A and B players and do their best to help C employees improve to the A or B level or be released from the organization. Topgrading includes sample interview guides and describes hiring methods to make sure you hire A and B players from the get go.

The book, Who, simplifies the Topgrading concepts by creating a system for hiring: Source, Scorecard, Select, and Sell. These four systems work together to ensure you hire the best employees possible. A further breakdown looks like this:

1) Source: Constantly reach out to A players in the market and create a list of people you would like to work for you. This way, when an opening occurs, you will have a strong Source to fill the spots.

2) Scorecard: Determine the key elements you are looking for in your position and design a scorecard for each key role you will be hiring. Use that scorecard to screen out who you will bring in for in-depth interviews. Careful screening prevents a host of problems in hiring.

3) Select: Determine who is best for the position through an in-depth Topgrade interview. The best predictor of future success is past success--don't cut corners in reference checking.

4) Sell: "A" players have options. Work hard to sell your organization to them.

The screening interview process was a highlight of this book. Who is a must have resource for every HR director and leader who wants to attract and secure top talent for their organization.
12 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x93cfd9a8) étoiles sur 5 Very flawed- Too many absolutes- but good for very large firms with groupthink pigeonhole roles 23 février 2016
Par Charles - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
Hiring is a black art, even big data led initiatives going back to find data points to find what the "best" employee looks like - they actually found a negative correlation between good interviewees and actual job performance.
The book is further flawed by assuming the bucket list qualifications that HR cooks up is what's needed in the company and is unassailable in its correctness. When was HR great? Anyone? If it’s so important why are there never any CEOs in for profit companies with HR backgrounds if people matter so much?
Cold recruiting:
The book also assumes that candidates contacted that say no, are really a negotiation starting point. And that you would be able to grill the hell out of that person if they agree for a quick coffee.
The problem is that innovation, out of the box thinking and real outperformance is always done by outliers by outsiders that don’t play by the rules. This is exactly what a “A” player is, totally different from B’s and C’s because they do things very differently and have a skill set that can vary from feeble to outstanding. This book doesn’t address any of these important issues.
When did you have a bad boss?
(studies show the majority of management is bad, and bad middle mgt. is mainly responsible for people quitting, not the overall company)
SO the book assumes that the employer is king, is right all the time, ignores that companies go bankrupt, lose money, produce bad products, etc.
So what you get is devious candidates that are great story tellers, never slighting the boss, or the company or telling what it is really like. Basically you are going to hire great politicians with this book.
In other words, Group think is what the book is promoting.
+Anyone found not matching the huge bucket list is out.
+Anyone who has an opinion or worked for a "bad" boss and told the interviewer is out. Becaue no bosses are bad.
+Anyone found with a stories not matching the vague job posting is out. Zero tolerance hiring.
+Anyone matching too much what we are looking for is out- because parroting.
+Threaten all candidates by telling them we will call your boss, talk to your subordinates, your customers, and you will name names.
The average wage in the USA is under $50k a year.
You are telling me that you cannot make a $3850 decision? (1 month of salary) OR a 11 grand decision? (3month trial) the average car costs $32k and a test drive takes avg. 8 mins. There are 350m cars on the road.
Reference checks:
How honest are people going to be with reference checks? It’s a charade. Calling subordinates is the worst thing you can do- of course they are going tell lies, they need a reference from their old boss. Peers? Even worse, as this natively assumes perfect harmony, no jealousy, no competitiveness getting open positions when they worked together and now assumes the ex- colleague doesn’t work for a competitor and has no agenda.
This book is just a warm blanket to at best take out super weak candidates anyone would vet out anyway.

Read with a grain of salt.
16 internautes sur 18 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x93cfded0) étoiles sur 5 Excellent manual for how to hire great people 1 avril 2012
Par Brad Feld - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I wasn't looking forward to this book - I find books like this excruciating to read and generally hit "skim" by about page 30. I found this one to be really good - it drew me and and ended up being a very practical guide to how to hire great people. I'd recommend it to anyone in an entrepreneurial company who is responsible for interviewing and hiring people. I rarely send out book recommendations to the Foundry Group CEO list - I sent this one the day I got home.
13 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x93cfd78c) étoiles sur 5 Practical, straightforward, highly valuable 9 octobre 2008
Par The Good Manager - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I like this book because it sets out a clear point of view--that most of us have been neglecting a key component to business success: hiring in a rigorous manner. It then proceeds to offer a method for correcting this problem. I haven't yet tried the method itself, but I intend to. My preliminary reaction is that it makes intuitive sense, but that it's going to take a fair amount of time to implement successfully. The authors anticipate this response and argue that more time now saves an inordinate amount of time later. I'll add more once I've tried the method, but first response is positive.
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